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Immune sensors suppress colitis-associated cancer

Date:
April 15, 2010
Source:
Rockefeller University Press
Summary:
Particular components of inflammasomes -- protein complexes needed for generating immune responses to pathogens and cellular damage -- lessen the severity of colitis and colitis-associated colon cancer in mice, according to a new study.

Particular components of inflammasomes -- protein complexes needed for generating immune responses to pathogens and cellular damage -- lessen the severity of colitis and colitis-associated colon cancer in mice, according to a study published online this week in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.

Compared to healthy humans, patients with ulcerative colitis, a form of inflammatory bowel disease, have a higher risk of developing colorectal cancer. As the inflammasome is typically associated with activation of the immune system, Jenny Ting and co-workers suspected that mice lacking inflammasome components would be more resistant to colitis and associated colorectal cancer.

Unexpectedly, mice lacking some but not all inflammasome components developed more severe colitis and larger tumor burdens in the colon.

Additional work is needed to determine how specific inflammasome components protect against colitis in mice, and whether inflammasomes play similar roles in humans.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Rockefeller University Press. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Irving C. Allen, Erin Mcelvania Tekippe, Rita-Marie T. Woodford, Joshua M. Uronis, Eda K. Holl, Arlin B. Rogers, Hans H. Herfarth, Christian Jobin, and Jenny P.-Y. Ting. The NLRP3 inflammasome functions as a negative regulator of tumorigenesis during colitis-associated cancer. J Exp Med, April 12, 2010 DOI: 10.1084/jem.20100050

Cite This Page:

Rockefeller University Press. "Immune sensors suppress colitis-associated cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 April 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100412095533.htm>.
Rockefeller University Press. (2010, April 15). Immune sensors suppress colitis-associated cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100412095533.htm
Rockefeller University Press. "Immune sensors suppress colitis-associated cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100412095533.htm (accessed April 17, 2014).

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