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New role for zebrafish in human studies: Animal model uses mysterious enzyme also found in human brains

Date:
May 25, 2010
Source:
University of California - San Diego
Summary:
A researcher has discovered that zebrafish -- an important animal model in disease and environmental studies -- could provide the means to help scientists eventually reveal the function of a mysterious enzyme linked to the steroid cortisol, and found in the human brain.

Michael E. Baker, PhD, a researcher at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine has discovered that zebrafish -- an important animal model in disease and environmental studies -- could provide the means to help scientists eventually reveal the function of a mysterious enzyme linked to the steroid cortisol, and found in the human brain.

In people and other vertebrates, steroids like cortisol perform a variety of diverse duties, including regulating immune response, bone formation and brain activity. Too much cortisol, however, is unhealthy. High levels of the steroid have been linked to type 2 diabetes and may impair the brain's ability to store memories.

The human body regulates cortisol by employing an enzyme called 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-type 1 or 11beta-HSD1, which catalyzes the synthesis of cortisol in liver and fat cells. A related enzyme known as 11 beta-HSD-type3 or 11 beta-HSD3 is expressed in the brain, though its utility remains unknown.

In new findings to be published in the June 3 issue of FEBS Letters, Baker, a research professor of medicine who works in the division of nephrology-hypertension at UC San Diego's School of Medicine, reports that 11 beta-HSD3 (but not 11 beta-HSD1) is present in zebrafish, where it appears to serve an important role in fish endocrine physiology.

That makes the fish a potentially useful analog for cortisol studies, including discovering the purpose and function of 11 beta-HSD3 in human brains, which may be an evolutionary precursor to 11 beta-HSD1.

Interestingly, Baker found that the genomes of mice and rats do not contain 11 beta-HSD3, which means that inserting the appropriate gene for the enzyme in these animal models could provide additional avenues of investigation.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of California - San Diego. The original article was written by Scott LaFee. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Michael E. Baker. Evolution of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-type 1 and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-type 3. FEBS Letters, 2010; 584 (11): 2279 DOI: 10.1016/j.febslet.2010.03.036

Cite This Page:

University of California - San Diego. "New role for zebrafish in human studies: Animal model uses mysterious enzyme also found in human brains." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 May 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100519151741.htm>.
University of California - San Diego. (2010, May 25). New role for zebrafish in human studies: Animal model uses mysterious enzyme also found in human brains. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100519151741.htm
University of California - San Diego. "New role for zebrafish in human studies: Animal model uses mysterious enzyme also found in human brains." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100519151741.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

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