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Cardiac biomarker indicates fluid overload in dialysis patients

Date:
May 27, 2010
Source:
American Society of Nephrology
Summary:
Nephrologists must consider fluid overload effects when prescribing dialysis, according to a new study. The fluid overload biomarker, N-terminal pro-brain-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP), previously known as a "cardiac biomarker" in dialysis patients, is an important component of managing patients with kidney disease.

Nephrologists must consider fluid overload effects when prescribing dialysis, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN). The fluid overload biomarker, N-terminal pro-brain-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP), previously known as a "cardiac biomarker" in dialysis patients, is an important component of managing patients with kidney disease.

Fluid overload can cause misleading increases in body weight. "Assessment of dry or target weight is a fundamental concept in managing patients with end stage kidney disease, as volume overload leads to cardiac dysfunction and increased risk of death," explains Andrew Davenport, MD (University College London Medical School). Dry weight is the patient's weight without the extra fluid that builds up between dialysis sessions.

"Our study did not show any sustained association between NT-proBNP and cardiac function," comments Davenport. The results contrast with previous studies suggesting that NT-proBNP might be a useful biomarker to predict increased risk of cardiovascular events and death in patients with kidney disease. BNP is a chemical marker produced by overworked or damaged heart ventricles and accompanied by the loss of sodium through urine. A biomarker is a protein molecule that indicates progression of disease or response to medical therapy.

Dialysis patients with heart abnormalities may still have high NT-proBNP levels, according to an accompanying editorial by Patrick S. Parfrey, MD (Memorial University, St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada). However, when cardiac tests show normal heart function, "high BNP levels are likely the result of blood volume expansion, and require reduction in post dialysis dry weight," Parfrey writes.

Though this "cardiac biomarker" now appears to be more closely related to fluid status than to heart function, an association with heart dysfunction was found in those who had a history of hypertension and were taking beta blockers. High NT-proBNP levels might also indicate malnutrition, another common problem in dialysis patients.

The researchers measured NT-proBNP levels after a dialysis session in 72 stable dialysis patients. The patients also underwent tests of heart function. NT-proBNP levels were most associated with indicators of fluid overload. Maintaining proper fluid balance is one of the essential functions of dialysis. Excess fluid in the body―also called fluid overload or volume overload―can lead to the development of heart failure.

The study is limited by the fact that it was cross-sectional (all data collected at one time) rather than longitudinal (data collected over a period of time), according to Davenport.

Study co-authors were John Booth and Jennifer Pinney of University College London.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society of Nephrology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Andrew Davenport et al. N-terminal proBNP--Marker of Cardiac Dysfunction, Fluid Overload, or Malnutrition in Hemodialysis Patients? Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, May 27, 2010 DOI: 10.2215/CJN.09001209

Cite This Page:

American Society of Nephrology. "Cardiac biomarker indicates fluid overload in dialysis patients." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 May 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100527170955.htm>.
American Society of Nephrology. (2010, May 27). Cardiac biomarker indicates fluid overload in dialysis patients. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100527170955.htm
American Society of Nephrology. "Cardiac biomarker indicates fluid overload in dialysis patients." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100527170955.htm (accessed October 2, 2014).

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