Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New areas prone to moderate earthquakes identified in Iberian Peninsula

Date:
June 24, 2010
Source:
Plataforma SINC
Summary:
Some areas of the Iberian Peninsula, where earthquakes of moderate magnitude have never yet been recorded, such as certain parts of the Cordillera Cantábrica mountain range, the far west of the Cordilleras Béticas mountains and the north of Valencia, could have the potential to generate such quakes, according to a new study.

The map indicates the nodes (circles) with the potential to generate moderate earthquakes in the Iberian Peninsula and earthquakes historically (blue dots) of that magnitude.
Credit: A. I. Gorshkov et al.

Some areas of the Iberian Peninsula, where earthquakes of moderate magnitude have never yet been recorded, such as certain parts of the Cordillera Cantábrica mountain range, the far west of the Cordilleras Béticas mountains and the north of Valencia, could have the potential to generate such quakes, according to a study produced by Spanish, Russian and Italian scientists and published this month in the journal Rendiconti Lincei.

"The methodology we have used confirms the most seismically significant areas of the Iberian Peninsula, but also identifies possible sources of earthquakes with magnitudes of over five in some areas where, to date, none have been recorded," says Mariano García-Fernández, co-author of the study and a researcher at the Spanish National Museum of Natural Sciences (CSIC).

According to the study, which has been published in the latest issue of the journal Rendiconti Lincei, these areas are located in some parts of the Cordillera Cantábrica mountain range, the northern coast of Portugal, the far west of the Cordilleras Béticas mountains and the north of Valencia. The remaining areas with the potential for moderate seismic activity are the same as those shown on seismic maps -- around the edges of the Peninsula, above all the south east and the Pyrenees.

"The important thing about this study is that it identifies zones prone to moderate earthquakes at regional level, although this does not mean they will ever happen," points out García-Fernández.

The researcher explains that the magnitude 5 was chosen as the threshold for potential earthquakes "since it is above this level that you start to see significant damage to structures."

In search of nodes

The research, which is the fruit of collaboration between scientists at the Russian Academy of Sciences, the International Centre for Theoretical Physics and the University of Trieste (Italy) and the CSIC, is based on the morphostructural zoning method. The technique uses topographic, geological and geophysical information, along with satellite imagery, to identify the nodes or intersection points of morphostructural lines.

These nodes are classified as likely to cause earthquakes of a specific threshold size by combining the seismicity data from seismic catalogues with mathematical recognition methods, similar to those used in voice or fingerprint identification.

García-Fernández insists that the resulting classification does not necessarily mean that the potentially seismic nodes identified will produce earthquakes of this size, "but rather that their features make them more susceptible than those classified as having lower potential."

The authors of the study are confident that the results will make it possible to better identify the continental seismogenic sources affecting the Iberian Peninsula. This will allow progress to be made in studies into danger levels and seismic risk at regional scale and in specific places, such as metropolitan areas or special structures such as nuclear power plants and large dams.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Plataforma SINC. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. A. I. Gorshkov, A. A. Soloviev, M. J. Jiménez, M. García-Fernández, G. F. Panza. Recognition of earthquake-prone areas (M ≥ 5.0) in the Iberian Peninsula. Rendiconti Lincei, 2010; 21 (2): 131 DOI: 10.1007/s12210-010-0075-3

Cite This Page:

Plataforma SINC. "New areas prone to moderate earthquakes identified in Iberian Peninsula." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 June 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100622074822.htm>.
Plataforma SINC. (2010, June 24). New areas prone to moderate earthquakes identified in Iberian Peninsula. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100622074822.htm
Plataforma SINC. "New areas prone to moderate earthquakes identified in Iberian Peninsula." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100622074822.htm (accessed October 22, 2014).

Share This



More Earth & Climate News

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

San Diego Zoo's White Rhinos Provide Hope for the Critically Endangered Species

San Diego Zoo's White Rhinos Provide Hope for the Critically Endangered Species

Reuters - Light News Video Online (Oct. 22, 2014) — The pair of rare white northern rhinos bring hope for their species as only six remain in the world. Elly Park reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Trick-or-Treating Banned Because of Polar Bears

Trick-or-Treating Banned Because of Polar Bears

Buzz60 (Oct. 21, 2014) — Mother Nature is pulling a trick on the kids of Arviat, Canada. As Mara Montalbano (@maramontalbano) tells us, the effects of global warming caused the town to ban trick-or-treating this Halloween. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Traditional Farming Methods Gaining Ground in Mali

Traditional Farming Methods Gaining Ground in Mali

AFP (Oct. 20, 2014) — He is leading a one man agricultural revolution in Mali - Oumar Diatabe uses traditional farming methods to get the most out of his land and is teaching others across the country how to do the same. Duration: 01:44 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Detroit's Money Woes Led To U.N.-Condemned Water Cutoffs

How Detroit's Money Woes Led To U.N.-Condemned Water Cutoffs

Newsy (Oct. 20, 2014) — The United Nations says water is a human right, but should it be free? Detroit has cut off water to residents who can't pay, and the U.N. isn't happy. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins