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Potential cure discovered for degenerative vision diseases leading to terminal blindness

Date:
August 6, 2010
Source:
Office of Naval Research
Summary:
Neurobiologists have discovered a potential cure for degenerative vision diseases leading to terminal blindness. Scientists may have discovered a cure to degenerative vision diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa. By manipulating proteins that cause blindness in mice the scientists have successfully restored vision in the light-sensing cells of the retina.
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FULL STORY

The retina on the left is normal. The one on the right displays retinitis pigmentosa.
Credit: Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research

Neurobiologists funded by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) have discovered a potential cure for degenerative vision diseases leading to terminal blindness. The solution, however, may be rooted in an unconventional therapeutic approach.

Scientists at the Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research in Basel, Switzerland, are manipulating the proteins that cause blindness in mice. The scientists have successfully restored vision in the light-sensing cells of the retina.

Dr. Thomas McKenna, program officer for ONR's Neural Computation Program, said this research has significant future implications.

"In the course of their study, these researchers discovered an approach to restore vision in blind mice with congenital macular degeneration," McKenna said. "This technology shows great promise for the partial restoration of vision for blind patients."

This initiative, supported by ONR Global's Naval International Cooperative Opportunities in Science and Technology Program (NICOP), studies retinitis pigmentosa, the incurable genetic eye disease, which causes more than 2 million worldwide cases of tunnel vision and night blindness. If left untreated, the disease can lead to complete blindness as the color-sensing cells in the retina slowly degenerate.

Dr. Clay Stewart, technical director, ONR Global, explained the importance of the NICOP program for providing a platform for innovative international basic research that could ultimately have a profound impact on naval activities.

McKenna, a recipient of the 2009 Delores M. Etter Top Scientists and Engineers of the Year award, said additional studies are needed before making the treatment available to visually challenged populations. Next, the team plans to explore the duration of therapeutic effects and whether the gene therapy could have applications for other eye diseases.

ONR's research is part of a global effort to combat visual diseases. The American Foundation for the Blind, a national nonprofit organization, reports that more than 25 million U.S. adults have some form vision loss. According to the Foundation Fighting Blindness, about 100,000 Americans suffer from retinitis pigmentosa.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Office of Naval Research. The original article was written by Rob Anastasio. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Office of Naval Research. "Potential cure discovered for degenerative vision diseases leading to terminal blindness." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 August 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100804122719.htm>.
Office of Naval Research. (2010, August 6). Potential cure discovered for degenerative vision diseases leading to terminal blindness. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 3, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100804122719.htm
Office of Naval Research. "Potential cure discovered for degenerative vision diseases leading to terminal blindness." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100804122719.htm (accessed May 3, 2015).

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