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New approaches could help defeat HIV

Date:
August 10, 2010
Source:
The Biochemical Society
Summary:
Drug resistance remains a major problem in combating HIV infection, but a different approach to drug development could be the answer. Current viral inhibitors target the HIV-1 protease function with a competitive mechanism. New research suggests that pharmaceutical companies look at compounds that use an allosteric non-competitive mechanism of inhibition.

Drug resistance remains a major problem in combating HIV infection, but a different approach to drug development could be the answer.

Current viral inhibitors target the HIV-1 protease function with a competitive mechanism. Writing in the BJ ChemBio Knowledge Environment of the Biochemical Journal, Max Chang and colleagues from the Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, suggest that pharmaceutical companies look at compounds that use an allosteric non-competitive mechanism of inhibition.

The scientists examined 44 000 compounds that have already been shown to be effective at disrupting protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interfaces and identified a compound which inhibits wild-type HIV-1 protease, as well as a drug-resistant form of protease.

Guy Salvesen, Vice Chair, The Americas, for the Biochemical Journal, said: "A major problem that plagues efficient pharmaceutical therapy is the poor selectivity of, and development of resistance to, drugs that target enzyme active sites. This approach represents a vast majority of drug development efforts for not only AIDS, but also for cancer and inflammatory diseases. The mindset of pharmaceutical chemists needs to be changed to explore more productive areas, and the paper by Max Chang and his colleagues provides a paradigm-shifting approach that, while still in its early days, would well be heeded by pharmaceutical companies."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by The Biochemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. MaxW. Chang, MichaelJ. Giffin, Rolf Muller, Jeremiah Savage, YingC. Lin, Sukwon Hong, Wei Jin, LandonR. Whitby, JohnH. Elder, DaleL. Boger, BruceE. Torbett. Identification of broad-based HIV-1 protease inhibitors from combinatorial libraries. Biochemical Journal, 2010; 429 (3): 527 DOI: 10.1042/BJ20091645

Cite This Page:

The Biochemical Society. "New approaches could help defeat HIV." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 August 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100810082640.htm>.
The Biochemical Society. (2010, August 10). New approaches could help defeat HIV. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100810082640.htm
The Biochemical Society. "New approaches could help defeat HIV." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100810082640.htm (accessed July 24, 2014).

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