Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

All pain is not the same: Psychologist discusses gender differences in chronic pain

Date:
August 12, 2010
Source:
American Psychological Association
Summary:
Women experience chronic pain longer, more intensely and more often than men, according to a psychologist who works with both men and women dealing with diseases and conditions that leave them suffering.

Women experience chronic pain longer, more intensely and more often than men, according to a psychologist who works with both men and women dealing with diseases and conditions that leave them suffering.

"Chronic pain affects a higher proportion of women than men around the world," said Jennifer Kelly, PhD, of the Atlanta Center for Behavioral Medicine. "We need to encourage women to take a more active role in their treatment and reduce the stigma and embarrassment of this problem."

Speaking August 12 at the 118th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association, Kelly said the latest research offers interesting insights into how physicians and mental health providers can better treat women with chronic pain.

Pain is considered chronic when it lasts six months or longer and most medical treatment options have been exhausted. Chronic pain conditions that are more prevalent in women than in men include fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis and migraines, said Kelly, referencing the International Association for the Study of Pain's 2007-2008 report on pain in women.

Women are also more likely than men to experience multiple painful conditions simultaneously, which can lead to greater psychological distress and greater likelihood of disability, according to the report.

Hormones may be to blame for these differences, said Kelly, who added that estrogen clearly plays a role in conditions such as migraines. Rates of other painful conditions increase for girls as they pass through puberty whereas rates for adolescent boys are stable or rise less steeply. "Pain perception does vary according to the menstrual cycle phases in women with chronic pain," said Kelly. "For example, temporomandibular [jaw] pain, or TMJ, is highest in the pre-menstrual period and during menses."

As for treating pain, studies have shown men and women experience different side effects of analgesic medications. There have also been studies into whether men respond better to opioid medications, but the findings are ambiguous at best, she said. However, research has shown that there are numerous factors involved in response to pain medications. "Genetic and hormonal differences may be the main reason for any differences, but it's becoming increasingly clear that social and psychological factors are also important," said Kelly.

In her practice, Kelly treats the social and psychological factors in dealing with patients with chronic pain. She has made many observations of how women handle pain differently than men. "Women tend to focus on the emotional aspects of pain," she said. "Men tend to focus on the physical sensations they experience. Women who concentrate on the emotional aspects of their pain may actually experience more pain as a result, possibly because the emotions associated with pain are negative."

Kelly offered these tips for better treatment of patients with chronic pain, especially women:

  • Encourage patients to take an active role in their treatment and in caring for themselves, such as eating well and getting exercise
  • Provide psychological support
  • Explore cognitive coping strategies
  • Offer relaxation and biofeedback training

Depressed patients may also benefit from psychotropic medications, she said, but antidepressants should not serve as a replacement for psychological intervention. She advocated for cognitive coping strategies that work on changing the thoughts associated with the pain. "If women can see the pain as something that can be managed and something that they can work with, then they can make more positive modifications in their life and become more functional," she said.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Psychological Association. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Psychological Association. "All pain is not the same: Psychologist discusses gender differences in chronic pain." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 August 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100812161930.htm>.
American Psychological Association. (2010, August 12). All pain is not the same: Psychologist discusses gender differences in chronic pain. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100812161930.htm
American Psychological Association. "All pain is not the same: Psychologist discusses gender differences in chronic pain." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100812161930.htm (accessed August 1, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Friday, August 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Vaccine Might Be Coming, But Where's It Been?

Ebola Vaccine Might Be Coming, But Where's It Been?

Newsy (Aug. 1, 2014) Health officials are working to fast-track a vaccine — the West-African Ebola outbreak has killed more than 700. But why didn't we already have one? Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Study Links Certain Birth Control Pills To Breast Cancer

Study Links Certain Birth Control Pills To Breast Cancer

Newsy (Aug. 1, 2014) Previous studies have made the link between birth control and breast cancer, but the latest makes the link to high-estrogen oral contraceptives. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
House Republicans Vote to Sue Obama Over Healthcare Law

House Republicans Vote to Sue Obama Over Healthcare Law

Reuters - US Online Video (July 31, 2014) The Republican-led House of Representatives votes to sue President Obama, accusing him of overstepping his executive authority in making changes to the Affordable Care Act. Mana Rabiee reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Uganda on Alert for Ebola but No Confirmed Cases

Uganda on Alert for Ebola but No Confirmed Cases

AFP (July 31, 2014) Uganda's health minister said on Thursday that there are no confirmed cases of Ebola in the country, but that it remained on alert for cases of the deadly virus. Uganda has suffered Ebola outbreaks in the past, most recently in 2012. Duration: 00:59 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins