Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Implant blood test: Shape memory alloys are biocompatible, new research shows

Date:
September 15, 2010
Source:
Inderscience
Summary:
A European team has demonstrated that modern technological materials used in a wide range of medical devices and implants are entirely biocompatible and should not health problems as has previously been suggested.

A European team has demonstrated that modern technological materials used in a wide range of medical devices and implants are entirely biocompatible and should not health problems as has previously been suggested.

Writing in the International Journal of Immunological Studies, Rebeka Rudolf of the University of Maribor, Slovenia, and colleagues there and at the University of Leoben, Austria, and the Military Medical Academy, in Belgrade, Serbia, explain how shape memory alloys (SMAs) are used increasingly in medical implants, guide wires for catheters, blood vessel stents, filters and actuators. Devices and components made from these materials can be bent and squeezed into a target body cavity or vessel after which they then revert to their original, working shape. Concerns about the toxicity of SMAs, which often contain nickel or copper, have been voiced despite earlier tests that show them to be entirely biocompatible.

Now, Rudolf and colleagues have used immune system cells, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, to demonstrate that SMAs made from copper-aluminium-nickel (Cu-Al-Ni) and nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) do not damage the body or trigger cell death.

The researchers prepared samples of SMAs as thin ribbons using melt spinning. They then cultured PB-MNCs from 20 donors in a solution containing a Cu-Al-Ni SMA and saw no significant changes in the production of immune system mediators, known as cytokines, in 18 of the 20 test cultures. However, for two of the donor cells there was a marked immune response thaws easily seen as inflammatory cytokines were released by the cells. The team suggests that their test could provide the medical profession with a quick and easy way to test a prospective patient for biocompatibility of a particular device.

"This is the first report showing the influence of SMA materials produced as thin ribbons by spin melting technology on human cells," the team says. "By using a simple screening test it should possible to identify those individuals who would develop an inflammatory response in contact with a biomaterial and so predict undesirable reactions before implantation," they add.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Inderscience. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Rebeka Rudolf, Kambiz Mehrabi, Albert C. Kneissl, Mihael Bruncko, Ivan Anzel, Sergej Tomic, Tanja Dzopalic, Miodrag Colic. The response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to shape memory alloys. International Journal of Immunological Studies, 2010; 1 (2): 214 DOI: 10.1504/IJIS.2010.034903

Cite This Page:

Inderscience. "Implant blood test: Shape memory alloys are biocompatible, new research shows." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 September 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100914074814.htm>.
Inderscience. (2010, September 15). Implant blood test: Shape memory alloys are biocompatible, new research shows. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100914074814.htm
Inderscience. "Implant blood test: Shape memory alloys are biocompatible, new research shows." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100914074814.htm (accessed September 20, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, September 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Sierra Leone's Nationwide Ebola Curfew Underway

Sierra Leone's Nationwide Ebola Curfew Underway

Newsy (Sep. 20, 2014) Sierra Leone is locked down as aid workers and volunteers look for new cases of Ebola. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Changes Found In Brain After One Dose Of Antidepressants

Changes Found In Brain After One Dose Of Antidepressants

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) A study suggest antidepressants can kick in much sooner than previously thought. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) The study found elderly people are much more likely to become susceptible to infection than younger adults going though a similar situation. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Jury Delivers Verdict in Salmonella Trial

Jury Delivers Verdict in Salmonella Trial

AP (Sep. 19, 2014) A federal jury has convicted three people in connection with an outbreak of salmonella poisoning five years ago that sickened hundreds of people and was linked to a number of deaths. (Sept. 19) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins