Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

No support for routine prostate screening, but one-off test at 60 may be beneficial

Date:
September 14, 2010
Source:
BMJ-British Medical Journal
Summary:
Existing evidence from randomized controlled trials does not support routine population screening for prostate cancer, a new study concludes. However, a second study suggests that a single test at age 60 could identify men who are most likely to develop and die from prostate cancer. These men could then be monitored more closely, while others could be exempt from further screening.

Existing evidence from randomised controlled trials does not support routine population screening for prostate cancer, concludes a study published online in the British Medical Journal.

However, a second study suggests that a single test at age 60 could identify men who are most likely to develop and die from prostate cancer. These men could then be monitored more closely, while others could be exempt from further screening.

Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers among men worldwide. Screening is widely used in many countries, but it remains controversial because experts can't agree whether the benefits of screening outweigh the potential harms and costs of over-diagnosis and over-treatment of healthy men.

In 2006, a review of two randomised controlled trials concluded that there was not enough evidence to support routine prostate cancer screening. Since then, four new trials have been published.

So Professor Philipp Dahm and colleagues at the University of Florida reviewed all six trials, involving 387,286 participants. They found that screening aids in the diagnosis of prostate cancer at an earlier stage, but does not have a significant impact on mortality, and comes at the risk of over-treatment.

The authors say there is insufficient evidence to support actively inviting all men in certain age groups to attend screening for prostate cancer (as happens with breast cancer screening for women), and they suggest men should be better informed about the uncertainties associated with screening.

In the second study, Professor Hans Lilja and colleagues show that a single prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level test at age 60 strongly predicts a man's lifetime risk of diagnosis and death from prostate cancer.

They found that 90% of prostate cancer deaths occurred in men with highest PSA levels at age 60, whereas men with average or low PSA levels had negligible rates of prostate cancer or death by age 85. Their results suggest that at least half of men aged 60 and older might be exempted from further prostate cancer screening, which would reduce over-diagnosis and over-treatment.

In an accompanying editorial, Gerald Andriole, Chief of Urologic Surgery at Washington University School of Medicine, suggests that PSA testing should be tailored to individual risk.

He recommends that young men at high risk of prostate cancer, such as those with a strong family history and higher baseline PSA concentrations, should be followed closely, while elderly men and those with a low risk of disease could be tested less often, if at all. "Approaches such as these will hopefully make the next 20 years of PSA based screening better than the first 20," he says.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by BMJ-British Medical Journal. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

BMJ-British Medical Journal. "No support for routine prostate screening, but one-off test at 60 may be beneficial." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 September 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100914191650.htm>.
BMJ-British Medical Journal. (2010, September 14). No support for routine prostate screening, but one-off test at 60 may be beneficial. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100914191650.htm
BMJ-British Medical Journal. "No support for routine prostate screening, but one-off test at 60 may be beneficial." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100914191650.htm (accessed July 31, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 30, 2014) Obamacare-related costs were said to be behind the profit plunge at Wellpoint and Humana, but Wellpoint sees the new exchanges boosting its earnings for the full year. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Peace Corps Pulls Workers From W. Africa Over Ebola Fears

Peace Corps Pulls Workers From W. Africa Over Ebola Fears

Newsy (July 30, 2014) The Peace Corps is one of several U.S.-based organizations to pull workers out of West Africa because of the Ebola outbreak. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Weather Kills 2K A Year, But Storms Aren't The Main Offender

Weather Kills 2K A Year, But Storms Aren't The Main Offender

Newsy (July 30, 2014) Health officials say 2,000 deaths occur each year in the U.S. due to weather, but it's excessive heat and cold that claim the most lives. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Concern Grows Over Worsening Ebola Crisis

Concern Grows Over Worsening Ebola Crisis

AFP (July 30, 2014) Pan-African airline ASKY has suspended all flights to and from the capitals of Liberia and Sierra Leone amid the worsening Ebola health crisis, which has so far caused 672 deaths in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. Duration: 00:43 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

    Technology News



      Save/Print:
      Share:

      Free Subscriptions


      Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

      Get Social & Mobile


      Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

      Have Feedback?


      Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
      Mobile: iPhone Android Web
      Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
      Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
      Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins