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Ancient Egypt's pyramids: Norwegian researcher unlocks construction secrets

Date:
September 24, 2010
Source:
The Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)
Summary:
Scientists from around the world have tried to understand how the Egyptians erected their giant pyramids. Now, an architect and researcher from Norway says he has the answer to this ancient, unsolved puzzle.

The precision system of Khufu's Great Pyramid.
Credit: Ole J. Bryn / NTNU

Scientists from around the world have tried to understand how the Egyptians erected their giant pyramids. Now, an architect and researcher at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) says he has the answer to this ancient, unsolved puzzle.

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Researchers have been so preoccupied by the weight of the stones that they tend to overlook two major problems: How did the Egyptians know exactly where to put the enormously heavy building blocks? And how was the master architect able to communicate detailed, highly precise plans to a workforce of 10,000 illiterate men?

A 7-million-ton structure

These were among the questions that confronted Ole J. Bryn, an architect and associate professor in NTNU's Faculty of Architecture and Fine Art when he began examining Khufu's Great Pyramid in Giza. Khufu's pyramid, better known as the Pyramid of Cheops, consists of 2.3 million limestone blocks weighing roughly 7 million tons. At 146.6 meters high, it held the record as the tallest structure ever built for nearly 4000 years.

What Bryn discovered was quite simple. He believes that the Egyptians invented the modern building grid, by separating the structure's measuring system from the physical building itself, thus introducing tolerance, as it is called in today's engineering and architectural professions.

The apex point a key

Bryn has studied the plans from the thirty oldest Egyptian pyramids, and discovered a precision system that made it possible for the Egyptians to reach the pyramid's last and highest point, the apex point, with an impressive degree of accuracy. By exploring and making a plan of the pyramid it is possible to prepare modern project documentation of not just one, but all pyramids from any given period.

As long as the architect knows the main dimensions of a pyramid, he can project the building as he would have done it with a modern building, but with building methods and measurements known from the ancient Egypt, Bryn says.

In a scientific article published May 2010 in the Nordic Journal of Architectural Research, Bryn discusses aspects that can explain the construction of a multitude of the Egyptian pyramids by taking the building grid, and not the physical building itself, as the starting point for the analysis.

A new map

If the principles behind Bryn's drawings are correct, then archaeologists will have a new "map" that demonstrates that the pyramids are not a "bunch of heavy rocks with unknown structures" but, rather, incredibly precise structures.

Ole J. Bryn's findings will be presented and explained at the exhibition The Apex Point in Trondheim from September 13th to October 1st. The exhibition is an official part of the program to celebrate the centenary (1910-2010) of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology.

About the author:

Ole J. Bryn is a former practising architect, and currently holds a position as Associate Professor at the Faculty of Architecture and Fine Art, the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim, Norway.

The development of Bryn's theories on the building grids used in Egyptian pyramids has benefited from cooperation with Dr. Michel Barsoum, Grosvenor and Distinguished Professor at the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by The Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Ole J. Bryn. Retracing Khufu's Great Pyramid. Nordic Journal of Architectural Research, 2010; 22 (1/2)

Cite This Page:

The Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU). "Ancient Egypt's pyramids: Norwegian researcher unlocks construction secrets." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 September 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100924084615.htm>.
The Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU). (2010, September 24). Ancient Egypt's pyramids: Norwegian researcher unlocks construction secrets. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100924084615.htm
The Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU). "Ancient Egypt's pyramids: Norwegian researcher unlocks construction secrets." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100924084615.htm (accessed December 18, 2014).

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