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Brilliant Northeast fall colors hang in the balance, and heat is the deciding factor

Date:
September 29, 2010
Source:
Cornell University
Summary:
The abundant sunshine we have had much of this summer and fall has likely produced leaves high in sugars, and sugars are important for production of anthocyanins pigments which produce rich red colors.
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Beautiful autumn colors.
Credit: iStockphoto

"The abundant sunshine we have had much of this summer and fall has likely produced leaves high in sugars, and sugars are important for production of anthocyanins pigments which produce rich red colors.

"Working against this backdrop for brilliant fall colors is the recent, record-breaking heat and many warm nights. The summer has been quite dry in many areas, and this too would tend to inhibit good color and also stretch out or delay color. The key is temperature," David Wolfe, professor of plant and soil ecology at Cornell University said.

According to Wolfe, the best autumn colors usually require:

  • A warm, wet spring
  • Moderate summer temperatures and weather that is not too dry
  • Sunny fall days, combined with cool, but not freezing nights, and no severe dry spell
  • No early frost, which will kill leaves, causing them to brown and drop early.

Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Cornell University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Cornell University. "Brilliant Northeast fall colors hang in the balance, and heat is the deciding factor." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 September 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100928152804.htm>.
Cornell University. (2010, September 29). Brilliant Northeast fall colors hang in the balance, and heat is the deciding factor. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 30, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100928152804.htm
Cornell University. "Brilliant Northeast fall colors hang in the balance, and heat is the deciding factor." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100928152804.htm (accessed August 30, 2015).

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