Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Got fish? Nutrition studies explore health benefits

Date:
October 18, 2010
Source:
USDA/Agricultural Research Service
Summary:
Some of America's most popular fish -- salmon and albacore tuna, for example -- are rich in healthful natural compounds known as omega-3 fatty acids. Ongoing studies by researchers are helping uncover new details about how these fish-oil components help protect us from chronic diseases.

Ongoing studies by U.S. agricultural scientists are helping to uncover new details about how omega-3 fatty acids -- common in fish like salmon -- may help protect people from chronic diseases such as diabetes.
Credit: iStockphoto/Robyn Mackenzie

Some of America's most popular fish--salmon and albacore tuna, for example--are rich in healthful natural compounds known as omega-3 fatty acids. Ongoing studies by U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) chemist Darshan S. Kelley and co-investigators are helping uncover new details about how these fish-oil components help protect us from chronic diseases.

Kelley is with the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Western Human Nutrition Research Center at the University of California-Davis. ARS is the USDA's principal intramural scientific research agency.

In an early study with laboratory mice, Kelley and colleagues investigated the interplay of two omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil-DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) and EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid)-and a third fatty acid, CLA (as trans-10, cis-12 CLA) found in some dietary supplements.

Kelley's 8-week test with 50 laboratory mice indicated that DHA protected the animals against two harmful side effects of CLA: CLA-induced insulin resistance and CLA-induced non-alcoholic fatty-liver disease. In contrast, EPA offered only partial protection against CLA-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and provided no protection against insulin resistance.

If untreated, insulin resistance can lead to diabetes. An estimated 36 million to 57 million Americans are insulin-resistant. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease can result in cirrhosis of the liver or liver cancer. The study appeared in a 2007 issue of Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders.

In related work, published in a 2009 article in Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care, Kelley and University of California-Davis graduate student Dawn Fedor reviewed results from several dozen EPA and DHA studies. In their review, the scientists indicate that findings reported in the past decade have been inconsistent in regard to the effects of EPA and DHA on insulin resistance in human volunteers.

Their review underscores the need for new investigations, with larger numbers of volunteers. Kelley, for example, would like to determine whether DHA can improve the ability of adult, pre-diabetic volunteers to use insulin efficiently, and thus help delay onset of diabetes. Such research might reveal more about the mechanisms of action that DHA and EPA use, the sites upon which they act in the human body, and the genes that control these mechanisms.

Read more about the research in the October 2010 issue of Agricultural Research magazine, available online at: http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/AR/archive/oct10/nutrition1010.htm.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by USDA/Agricultural Research Service. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

USDA/Agricultural Research Service. "Got fish? Nutrition studies explore health benefits." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 October 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101008105722.htm>.
USDA/Agricultural Research Service. (2010, October 18). Got fish? Nutrition studies explore health benefits. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101008105722.htm
USDA/Agricultural Research Service. "Got fish? Nutrition studies explore health benefits." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101008105722.htm (accessed July 25, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Friday, July 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

Newsy (July 24, 2014) The FDA approved Targiniq ER on Wednesday, a painkiller designed to keep users from abusing it. Like any new medication, however, it has doubters. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor At Forefront Of Fighting Ebola Outbreak Gets Ebola

Doctor At Forefront Of Fighting Ebola Outbreak Gets Ebola

Newsy (July 24, 2014) Sheik Umar Khan has treated many of the people infected in the Ebola outbreak, and now he's become one of them. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Condemned Man's US Execution Takes Nearly Two Hours

Condemned Man's US Execution Takes Nearly Two Hours

AFP (July 24, 2014) America's death penalty debate raged Thursday after it took nearly two hours for Arizona to execute a prisoner who lost a Supreme Court battle challenging the experimental lethal drug cocktail. Duration: 00:55 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Can Watching TV Make You Feel Like A Failure?

Can Watching TV Make You Feel Like A Failure?

Newsy (July 24, 2014) A study by German researchers claims watching TV while you're stressed out can make you feel guilty and like a failure. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

    Health News

      Environment News

        Technology News



          Save/Print:
          Share:

          Free Subscriptions


          Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

          Get Social & Mobile


          Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

          Have Feedback?


          Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
          Mobile: iPhone Android Web
          Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
          Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
          Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins