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Intriguing viral link to intestinal cancer in mice

Date:
October 11, 2010
Source:
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Summary:
More than 50 percent of adults in the United States test positive for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection. For most people, infection produces no symptoms and results in the virus persisting in the body for a long time. New research in mice now suggests that it is possible that HCMV infection could help promote intestinal cancer in humans, although more human studies are needed if such an association is to be confirmed.
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More than 50% of adults in the United States test positive for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection. For most people, infection produces no symptoms and results in the virus persisting in the body for a long time. HCMV infects many cell types in the body including the cells that line the intestines (IECs). New research, led by Sergio Lira, at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, shows that mice engineered to express the HCMV protein US28 in IECs develop intestinal tumors as they age.

These mice also develop more tumors than normal mice in a model of inflammation-induced intestinal tumors.

The authors therefore suggest that it is possible that HCMV infection could help promote intestinal cancer in humans, although they caution that much more work is needed if such an association is to be confirmed.


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Journal of Clinical Investigation. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Gerold Bongers et al. The cytomegalovirus-encoded chemokine receptor US28 promotes intestinal neoplasia in transgenic mice. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 2010 DOI: 10.1172/JCI42563

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Journal of Clinical Investigation. "Intriguing viral link to intestinal cancer in mice." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 October 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101011125833.htm>.
Journal of Clinical Investigation. (2010, October 11). Intriguing viral link to intestinal cancer in mice. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101011125833.htm
Journal of Clinical Investigation. "Intriguing viral link to intestinal cancer in mice." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101011125833.htm (accessed July 31, 2015).

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