Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Global map of the sickle cell gene supports 'malaria hypothesis'

Date:
November 2, 2010
Source:
Wellcome Trust
Summary:
At a global scale, the sickle cell gene is most commonly found in areas with historically high levels of malaria, adding geographical support to the hypothesis that the gene, while potentially deadly, avoids disappearing through natural selection by providing protection against malaria.

These are maps showing the distribution of the HbS "sickle cell gene" and the endemicity of malaria.
Credit: Malaria Atlas Project

At a global scale, the sickle cell gene is most commonly found in areas with historically high levels of malaria, adding geographical support to the hypothesis that the gene, while potentially deadly, avoids disappearing through natural selection by providing protection against malaria.

Related Articles


In a study funded by the Wellcome Trust, geographers, biologists and statisticians at the University of Oxford, together with colleagues from the KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Programme in Kenya, have produced the first detailed global map showing the distribution of the sickle cell gene. The results are published in the journal Nature Communications.

Haemoglobin S (HbS) is known to cause sickle cell disease, which is usually fatal if untreated. Natural selection suggests that such a disadvantageous gene should not survive, yet it is common in people of African, Mediterranean and Indian origin.

More than sixty years ago, researchers observed that the sickle cell gene tended to be more common in populations living in, or originating from, areas of high malaria prevalence. This led to the 'malaria hypothesis', which suggested that, although deadly when inherited from both parents, the gene provided a degree of protection from malaria in children inheriting it from just one parent. This protective advantage was strong enough in areas of intense malaria transmission for the gene to survive.

The malaria hypothesis has since been supported by both population and laboratory studies, but the original observations of a geographical overlap between frequency of the gene and malaria prevalence have never been tested beyond simple visual comparisons at the global scale.

To address this, Dr Fred Piel and colleagues collated all the information currently accessible on the occurrence of the sickle cell gene in native populations worldwide and, using modern mapping techniques, created a map of the global frequency of this gene. The map was then compared with the distribution and intensity of malaria before widespread malaria control.

The study showed that the sickle cell gene is most common in sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East and India, and that the areas of high frequency of this gene are coincident with historically high levels of malaria, thus confirming that the malaria hypothesis is correct at the global scale.

"This study highlights the first steps in our efforts to create an open-access, online database of the frequency of various inherited blood disorders," says lead author Dr Piel, from the University of Oxford. "Such databases will help improving estimates of their public health burden and guide where resources would be best applied."

Co-author Dr Simon Hay adds: "The malaria hypothesis is the text-book example of a natural selection 'balancing act', where selection against an unfavourable mutation is weighed against selection in favour of a protective gene.

The sickle frequency map was created as part of the activities of the Malaria Atlas Project, a multinational research collaboration funded primarily by the Wellcome Trust. Further information about the Malaria Atlas Project can be found at www.map.ox.ac.uk.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wellcome Trust. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Frιdιric B. Piel, Anand P. Patil, Rosalind E. Howes, Oscar A. Nyangiri, Peter W. Gething, Thomas N. Williams, David J. Weatherall, Simon I. Hay. Global distribution of the sickle cell gene and geographical confirmation of the malaria hypothesis. Nature Communications, 2010; 1 (8): 104 DOI: 10.1038/ncomms1104

Cite This Page:

Wellcome Trust. "Global map of the sickle cell gene supports 'malaria hypothesis'." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 November 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101102130133.htm>.
Wellcome Trust. (2010, November 2). Global map of the sickle cell gene supports 'malaria hypothesis'. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 1, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101102130133.htm
Wellcome Trust. "Global map of the sickle cell gene supports 'malaria hypothesis'." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101102130133.htm (accessed March 1, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, March 1, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Rehab Robot Helps Restore Damaged Muscles and Nerves

Rehab Robot Helps Restore Damaged Muscles and Nerves

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Mar. 1, 2015) — A rehabilitation robot prototype to help restore deteriorated nerves and muscles using electromyography and computer games. Ben Gruber reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could a $34 Smartphone Device Improve HIV Diagnosis in Africa?

Could a $34 Smartphone Device Improve HIV Diagnosis in Africa?

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Feb. 27, 2015) — A dongle that plugs into a Smartphone mimics a lab-based blood test for HIV and syphilis and can detect the diseases in 15 minutes, say researchers. Tara Cleary reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor Says Head Transplants Possible Within Two Years

Doctor Says Head Transplants Possible Within Two Years

Buzz60 (Feb. 27, 2015) — An Italian doctor is saying he could stick someone&apos;s head onto someone else&apos;s body. Patrick Jones (@Patrick_E_Jones) reports. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Your Dentist Could Help Screen You For Diabetes

How Your Dentist Could Help Screen You For Diabetes

Newsy (Feb. 27, 2015) — A new study from researchers at New York University suggests dentists could soon use blood samples taken from patients&apos; mouths to test for diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins