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New transportable technology detects bacteria in water

Date:
November 10, 2010
Source:
American Institute of Physics
Summary:
To keep soldiers in the battlefield healthy, the US Army is exploring new ways to detect harmful bacteria in water.

To keep soldiers in the battlefield healthy, the U.S. Army is exploring new ways to detect harmful bacteria in water.

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Current techniques for analyzing water in the field can take as long as 24 hours to complete, according to Bart Lipkens of Western New England College in Springfield, Massachusetts and his colleagues at Physical Sciences in Andover, Ma.

They are working on an alternative technology that uses sound waves to accelerate the process.

"The goal of our project is to speed up the detection of bacteria in water supplies," said Lipkens. "We're developing a first order trigger, an alarm that maybe there's something in the water that warrants further investigation."

Lipkens has created a device that quickly gathers bacterial spores from running water using acoustical radiation force. It broadcasts waves of ultrasound into the liquid, exerting a pressure on the bacteria that pushes it into a collection pocket. In previous work, Lipkens used this technique to successfully separate polystyrene beads from water.

The device can draw in 15 percent of the bacterial cells from the water in a single pass. When the flow is shut off, the bacteria settle and can then be transferred to another apparatus for identification. Compared to existing methods, this procedure is quick.

Bacillus cereus, the species of bacteria used in this experiment, is about a micron in diameter and harmless. But its properties are very similar to many types of bacteria that would be harmful in drinking water.

"We think we would ultimately get the same results with harmful bacteria," said Lipkens, who will present his data at the 2nd Pan-American/Iberian Meeting on Acoustics in Cancun, Mexico.

The talk "Separation of bacterial spores from flowing water in macroscale cavities by ultrasonic standing waves" by Bart Lipkens was presented on November 16.


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The above story is based on materials provided by American Institute of Physics. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Institute of Physics. "New transportable technology detects bacteria in water." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 November 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101110113159.htm>.
American Institute of Physics. (2010, November 10). New transportable technology detects bacteria in water. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 5, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101110113159.htm
American Institute of Physics. "New transportable technology detects bacteria in water." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101110113159.htm (accessed March 5, 2015).

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