Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Preservative-free nasal spray appears safe, remains sterile

Date:
February 11, 2011
Source:
JAMA and Archives Journals
Summary:
In a small, short-term study, a preservative-free, acidified nasal spray appears safe and well tolerated and maintained its sterility in an applicator used multiple times, according to a new report.

In a small, short-term study, a preservative-free, acidified nasal spray appears safe and well tolerated and maintained its sterility in an applicator used multiple times, according to a report in the November issue of Archives of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

"The health of a topical nasal spray user relies on the prevention of contamination of the solution," the authors write as background information in the article. "Pharmaceutical manufacturers add various preservatives to destroy or inhibit the growth of micro-organisms that may be introduced into the solution after the opening of its container." However, some of these preservatives have been association with injury to the mucus membrane of the nose and sinuses, changes to the cells in the nasal lining, immobility of nasal hairs or cilia, damage to DNA and other adverse effects.

Making saline nasal spray more acidic is an alternative way of maintaining sterility without chemical preservatives. William R. Ryan, M.D., now of the University of California, San Francisco, and Peter H. Hwang, M.D., of Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif., evaluated a saline solution formula acidified by hydrochloric acid. Twenty volunteers used the preservative-free nasal spray and a saline spray containing preservatives for one week each in random order, separated by a one-week washout period. At the beginning of the study and after the week of using each solution, participants reported their symptoms and underwent examination of their nasal passages with an endoscope. A sample from each nasal spray bottle was cultured for microorganism growth.

No differences were observed in symptoms or in endoscopy findings after using the preservative-free vs. preservative-containing spray. In addition, microorganism growth was not detected in any samples from either solution.

"Of those analyzed, we believe that the most important symptoms for determining the safety and tolerance of the preservative-free acidified solution nasal spray are nasal burning, smell disturbance, taste disturbance, nasal bleeding, purulent rhinorrhea [runny nose with pus], sore throat, need to blow nose, sneezing, runny nose, postnasal discharge, thick nasal discharge, ear fullness, ear pain and facial pain or pressure," the authors write. "There were no discernible differences in these symptoms between the two nasal sprays used." There were also no differences in discharge, swelling, redness and the growth of polyps in the nasal passages.

"In conclusion, the preservative-free acidified solution nasal spray used in this study seems to be safe, well tolerated and effective at maintaining a sterile solution in a multidose applicator among a small sample of users over a short period," the authors write. "A larger series with longer follow-up is planned. Further studies are also necessary to explore use of a preservative-free acidified solution as a medium for drug delivery."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by JAMA and Archives Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. William R. Ryan; Peter H. Hwang. Safety of a Preservative-Free Acidified Saline Nasal Spray: A Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-Controlled, Crossover Clinical Trial. Archives of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, 2010;136(11):1099-1103. DOI: 10.1001/archoto.2010.179

Cite This Page:

JAMA and Archives Journals. "Preservative-free nasal spray appears safe, remains sterile." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 February 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101115174019.htm>.
JAMA and Archives Journals. (2011, February 11). Preservative-free nasal spray appears safe, remains sterile. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101115174019.htm
JAMA and Archives Journals. "Preservative-free nasal spray appears safe, remains sterile." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101115174019.htm (accessed July 26, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, July 26, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Beatings and Addiction: Pakistan Drug 'clinic' Tortures Patients

Beatings and Addiction: Pakistan Drug 'clinic' Tortures Patients

AFP (July 24, 2014) A so-called drugs rehab 'clinic' is closed down in Pakistan after police find scores of ‘patients’ chained up alleging serial abuse. Duration 03:05 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Too Few Teens Receiving HPV Vaccination, CDC Says

Too Few Teens Receiving HPV Vaccination, CDC Says

Newsy (July 24, 2014) The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is blaming doctors for the low number of children being vaccinated for HPV. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

Newsy (July 24, 2014) The FDA approved Targiniq ER on Wednesday, a painkiller designed to keep users from abusing it. Like any new medication, however, it has doubters. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor At Forefront Of Fighting Ebola Outbreak Gets Ebola

Doctor At Forefront Of Fighting Ebola Outbreak Gets Ebola

Newsy (July 24, 2014) Sheik Umar Khan has treated many of the people infected in the Ebola outbreak, and now he's become one of them. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins