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Humans helped vultures colonize the Canary Islands

Date:
January 3, 2011
Source:
BioMed Central
Summary:
The Egyptian vulture population of the Canary Islands was established following the arrival of the first human settlers who brought livestock to the islands. A genetic comparison of Iberian and Canarian birds found that the Egyptian vulture population in the Canary Islands was likely established around 2500 years ago -- around the same time as humans began to colonize the islands.

The Egyptian vulture population of the Canary Islands was established following the arrival of the first human settlers who brought livestock to the islands. A genetic comparison of Iberian and Canarian birds, published in the open access journal BMC Evolutionary Biology, found that the Egyptian vulture population in the Canary Islands was likely established around 2500 years ago -- around the same time as humans began to colonise the islands.

Rosa Agudo worked with a team of researchers from the Dońana Biological Station, Seville, Spain, to investigate genetic and morphological changes between 143 Iberian birds and 242 from Fuerteventura, one of the Canary Islands. She said, "We found that the island vultures are significantly heavier and larger than those from Iberia. The establishment of this insular population took place some 2500 years ago, matching the date of human colonization. Our results suggest that human activity can trigger divergent evolution and that this process may take place on a relatively brief time scale."

The authors suggest that before the arrival of humans, the Canary Islands would not have been able to support vultures, as food resources would have been scarce, consisting only of the remains of seabirds and sea mammals, or of rodents. They say, "The introduction of new and abundant food sources by humans could have allowed not only colonization by vultures, but also their demographic expansion and their putative adaptation to the new island environment." For once, human activity has actually assisted in the diversification and adaptation of the Egyptian vulture, now globally threatened and classified as 'Endangered' on the IUCN Red List.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by BioMed Central. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Rosa Agudo, Ciro Rico, Carles Vilŕ, Fernando Hiraldo1 and José Antonio Donázar. The role of humans in the diversification of a threatened island raptor. BMC Evolutionary Biology, (in press) [link]

Cite This Page:

BioMed Central. "Humans helped vultures colonize the Canary Islands." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 January 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/12/101212194141.htm>.
BioMed Central. (2011, January 3). Humans helped vultures colonize the Canary Islands. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/12/101212194141.htm
BioMed Central. "Humans helped vultures colonize the Canary Islands." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/12/101212194141.htm (accessed October 22, 2014).

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