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New anti-HIV gene therapy makes T-cells resistant to HIV infection

Date:
January 26, 2011
Source:
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., Publishers
Summary:
An innovative genetic strategy for rendering T-cells resistant to HIV infection without affecting their normal growth and activity is described in a new research paper.
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FULL STORY

An innovative genetic strategy for rendering T-cells resistant to HIV infection without affecting their normal growth and activity is described in a paper published in Human Gene Therapy, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

A team of researchers from Japan, Korea, and the U.S. developed an anti-HIV gene therapy method in which a bacterial gene called mazF is transferred into CD4+ T-cells. The MazF protein is an enzyme (an mRNA interferase) that destroys gene transcripts, preventing protein synthesis. The design of this mazF gene therapy vector ensures that synthesis of the MazF protein is triggered by HIV infection. When HIV infects treated T lymphocytes, MazF is induced, blocking HIV replication and, essentially, making the T-cells HIV resistant.

This elegant gene therapy tool was developed by Hideto Chono and colleagues from Takara Bio Inc. (Otsu, Shiga, Japan), Seoul National University and ViroMed Co. (Seoul, Korea), National Institute of Biomedical Innovation (Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan), and Robert Wood Johnson Medical School (Piscataway, NJ). The authors describe the theory and science behind this strategy in the paper entitled, "Acquisition of HIV-1 Resistance in T Lymphocytes Using an ACA-Specific E. coli mRNA Interferase."

"The potential of using vectors to express genes within a cell to block viral infection was first considered by David Baltimore in a strategy called 'intracellular immunization.' This study illustrates a unique way in which intracellular immunization can be achieved," says James M. Wilson, MD, PhD, Editor-in-Chief, and Director of the Gene Therapy Program, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia.


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., Publishers. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Hideto Chono, Kazuya Matsumoto, Hiroshi Tsuda, Naoki Saito, Karim Lee, Sujeong Kim, Hiroaki Shibata, Naohide Ageyama, Keiji Terao, Yasuhiro Yasutomi, Junichi Mineno, Sunyoung Kim, Masayori Inouye, Ikunoshin Kato. Acquisition of HIV-1 Resistance in T Lymphocytes Using an ACA-SpecificE. colimRNA Interferase. Human Gene Therapy, 2011; 22 (1): 35 DOI: 10.1089/hum.2010.001

Cite This Page:

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., Publishers. "New anti-HIV gene therapy makes T-cells resistant to HIV infection." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 January 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/01/110126121059.htm>.
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., Publishers. (2011, January 26). New anti-HIV gene therapy makes T-cells resistant to HIV infection. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 1, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/01/110126121059.htm
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., Publishers. "New anti-HIV gene therapy makes T-cells resistant to HIV infection." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/01/110126121059.htm (accessed August 1, 2015).

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