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Research leads to improved calcium supplement derived from crustacean shells

Date:
February 18, 2011
Source:
American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
Summary:
Researchers in Israel have developed a unique technology that stabilizes an otherwise unstable form of calcium carbonate. This mineral form provides significantly higher biological absorption and retention rates than other sources presently used as dietary calcium supplements.

According to the new study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, this type of Amorphous Calcium Carbonate (ACC) consists of unstable, nano-sized particles. Several species of crustaceans, including freshwater crayfish, are capable of stabilizing this mineral form so they can efficiently store and rapidly re-use large calcium quantities. Using new technology inspired by the crustaceans’ natural process, the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev researchers tested this synthetic ACC compound against other commonly used calcium supplements. Results of experiments showed that the absorption and retention rates were up to 40 percent higher in the blood and 30 percent higher in bone when the ACC compound is compared to other calcium sources. Such dramatic enhancement in absorption may be useful in reducing the necessary dosage of calcium, lowering side effects and increasing a patient's compliance.
Credit: Marganit Capaso/Amorphical

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) researchers have developed a unique technology that stabilizes an otherwise unstable form of calcium carbonate. This mineral form provides significantly higher biological absorption and retention rates than other sources presently used as dietary calcium supplements.

Calcium is considered to be one of the most important minerals in the human body for maintaining bone mass and coronary health. Insufficient dietary calcium intake can induce osteoporosis and poor blood-clotting.

"Since most adults today achieve their daily dietary intake of calcium with supplements, this new form will prove to be substantially more beneficial," according to Dr. Amir Berman, a researcher and a member of the BGU Ilse Katz Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology.

According to the new study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, this type of Amorphous Calcium Carbonate (ACC) consists of unstable, nano-sized particles. Several species of crustaceans, including freshwater crayfish, are capable of stabilizing this mineral form so they can efficiently store and rapidly re-use large calcium quantities. Using new technology inspired by the crustaceans' natural process, the BGU researchers tested this synthetic ACC compound against other commonly used calcium supplements.

Results of experiments performed on laboratory animals showed that the absorption and retention rates were up to 40 percent higher in the blood and 30 percent higher in bone when the ACC compound is compared to other calcium sources. Such dramatic enhancement in absorption may be useful in reducing the necessary dosage of calcium, lowering side effects and increasing a patient's compliance.

This research was supported by a grant from Amorphical, Ltd., through B.G. Negev, Ltd. Amorphical Ltd. (www.amorphical.com) will be introducing a dietary supplement utilizing the ACC compound in 2011.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Oren E Meiron, Elad Bar-David, Eliahu D Aflalo, Assaf Shechter, David Stepensky, Amir Berman, Amir Sagi. Solubility and bioavailability of stabilized amorphous calcium carbonate. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, 2011; 26 (2): 364 DOI: 10.1002/jbmr.196

Cite This Page:

American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. "Research leads to improved calcium supplement derived from crustacean shells." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 February 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110218092543.htm>.
American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. (2011, February 18). Research leads to improved calcium supplement derived from crustacean shells. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110218092543.htm
American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. "Research leads to improved calcium supplement derived from crustacean shells." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110218092543.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

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