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Early brain effects of HIV in mouse model

Date:
March 2, 2011
Source:
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse
Summary:
A new mouse model closely resembles how the human body reacts to early HIV infection and is shedding light on nerve cell damage related to the disease, according to researchers.
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A new mouse model closely resembles how the human body reacts to early HIV infection and is shedding light on nerve cell damage related to the disease, according to researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health.

The study in the Journal of Neuroscience demonstrates that HIV infection of the nervous system leads to inflammatory responses, changes in brain cells, and damage to neurons. This is the first study to show such neuronal loss during initial stages of HIV infection in a mouse model.

The study was conducted by a team of scientists from the University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, and the University of Rochester Medical Center, N.Y. It was supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, the National Institute of Mental Health, and the National Center for Research Resources.

"This research breakthrough should help us move forward in learning more about how HIV affects important brain functioning in its initial stages, which in turn could lead us to better treatments that can be used early in the disease process," said Dr. Nora D. Volkow, director of NIDA.

"The work contained within this study is the culmination of a 20-year quest to develop a rodent model of the primary neurological complications of HIV infection in humans," said Dr. Howard Gendelman, one of the primary study authors. "Previously, the rhesus macaque was the only animal model for the study of early stages of HIV infection. However, its use was limited due to expense and issues with generalizing results across species. Relevant rodent models that mimic human disease have been sorely needed."


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. P. K. Dash, S. Gorantla, H. E. Gendelman, J. Knibbe, G. P. Casale, E. Makarov, A. A. Epstein, H. A. Gelbard, M. D. Boska, L. Y. Poluektova. Loss of Neuronal Integrity during Progressive HIV-1 Infection of Humanized Mice. Journal of Neuroscience, 2011; 31 (9): 3148 DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.5473-10.2011

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NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse. "Early brain effects of HIV in mouse model." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 March 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110302121907.htm>.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse. (2011, March 2). Early brain effects of HIV in mouse model. ScienceDaily. Retrieved June 30, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110302121907.htm
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse. "Early brain effects of HIV in mouse model." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110302121907.htm (accessed June 30, 2015).

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