Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Genetic pathways involved in breast cancer identified

Date:
March 3, 2011
Source:
Michigan State University
Summary:
Using recent advances in genomics, researchers have uncovered a genetic pathway that affects the development of breast cancer, work that could help predict which patients are at risk of relapse for the disease.

Using recent advances in genomics, researchers have uncovered a genetic pathway that affects the development of breast cancer, work that could help predict which patients are at risk of relapse for the disease.

By studying which genes are expressed -- or "turned on" -- in breast cancer, research led by Michigan State University's Eran Andrechek uncovered a role for several members of the E2F family of genes, which control cell division and growth.

Specifically, Andrechek's team found the activation of the specific gene E2F2 was associated with a higher probability of breast cancer relapse in humans. The research team, using rodent models, also found that removing the E2F2 gene significantly decreased the likelihood of a tumor.

The findings, to be published in the journal Cancer Research.

"Genomic signatures -- how genes interact and via what pathways -- are a rapidly growing and a powerful method to analyze specific genes in the development, recurrence and spread of breast cancer," said Andrechek, an assistant professor in the MSU Department of Physiology and lead author of the paper.

After identifying which genes are being activated, physicians can tailor treatments for breast cancer and other diseases to individuals with certain genetic makeups. For example, breast cancer patients with over-expression of a gene called HER2 are currently treated with the antibody Herceptin, which specifically targets the cells over-expressing HER2.

"With personalized medicine, we can use predictions of how genes will interact, and based on that we can make better use of existing treatments that will have more of an impact," Andrechek said.

As part of the research, Andrechek and his team focused on tumors initiated by Myc, a gene that is amplified in 15 percent of all human breast cancer cases. The team then analyzed the tumors to test which pathways were critical to tumor growth, first in computer models and then in rodent models.

In addition to the discovery of E2F2's role in tumor incidence and relapse, the research also revealed the gene was critical for the development of a type of basal tumor. These tumors are similar to the so-called "triple negative tumors" in human breast cancer that are more prevalent among blacks and are much more difficult to treat.

An extension of Andrechek's work has recently been funded by the Elsa U. Pardee Foundation -- a Michigan organization that has given more than $113 million in grants for cancer research -- to explore therapy options based on genomic profiles.

"We want to examine how we can design therapies for specific tumor types by combining genomics and current medicines," he said. "We feel this holds great promise for personalized cancer therapy."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Michigan State University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. K. Fujiwara, I. Yuwanita, D. P. Hollern, E. R. Andrechek. Prediction and Genetic Demonstration of a Role for Activator E2Fs in Myc-Induced Tumors. Cancer Research, 2011; DOI: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-10-2386

Cite This Page:

Michigan State University. "Genetic pathways involved in breast cancer identified." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 March 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110303120852.htm>.
Michigan State University. (2011, March 3). Genetic pathways involved in breast cancer identified. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110303120852.htm
Michigan State University. "Genetic pathways involved in breast cancer identified." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110303120852.htm (accessed September 19, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, September 19, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

The Cost of Ebola

The Cost of Ebola

Reuters - Business Video Online (Sep. 18, 2014) As Sierra Leone prepares for a three-day "lockdown" in its latest bid to stem the spread of Ebola, Ciara Lee looks at the financial implications of fighting the largest ever outbreak of the disease. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
What HealthKit Bug Means For Your iOS Fitness Apps

What HealthKit Bug Means For Your iOS Fitness Apps

Newsy (Sep. 18, 2014) Apple has delayed the launch of the HealthKit app platform, citing a bug. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
U.S. Food Makers Surpass Calorie-Cutting Pledge

U.S. Food Makers Surpass Calorie-Cutting Pledge

Newsy (Sep. 18, 2014) Sixteen large food and beverage companies in the United States that committed to cut calories in their products far surpassed their target. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Residents Vaccinated as Haiti Fights Cholera Epidemic

Residents Vaccinated as Haiti Fights Cholera Epidemic

AFP (Sep. 18, 2014) Haitians receive the second dose of the vaccine against cholera as part of the UN's vaccination campaign. Duration: 00:34 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins