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Engineered protein has potential for new anti-inflamatory treatment

Date:
March 11, 2011
Source:
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine
Summary:
Researchers have created a new protein molecule derived from the growth factor progranulin may provide the basis for new therapies in inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, according to a new study.
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Researchers from across multiple disciplines at NYU Langone Medical Center created a new protein molecule derived from the growth factor progranulin may provide the basis for new therapies in inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, according to a study published in the March 10, 2011 issue of Science.

"The development of this protein extends our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that drive the growth factors and cytokines control of cartilage development and arthritis," said Chuan-ju Liu, PhD, the lead researcher and associate professor, Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery and Cell Biology, NYU Langone Medical Center. "Whether the protein accounts for all of the anti-inflammatory effects we observed in the study needs to replicated, but we are very encouraged by these initial results."

Over the last 20 years research in rheumatology has focused on identifying cytokines (cell-signaling protein molecules secreted by the glial cells of the nervous system and other cells in the immune system responsible for intercellular communication), leading to the inflammatory and degenerative processes in rheumatoid arthritis. The molecule created and used in this study, called ATSTTRIN (antagonist of TNF/TNFR signaling via targeting to TNF receptors), is a peptide constructed from segments of proteins that originate within a cell, which has a high affinity and specificity for binding to tumor necrosis factor receptors (TNFR).

The researchers suggest that this progranulin-derived protein could result in alternative treatments to those suffering from chronic autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's diseases, ulcerative colitis, ankylosing spondylitis, plaque psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

Dr. Liu's co-authors include Wei Tang and Yi Lu, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan, China and NYU Langone Medical Center; Qing-Yun Tian, Michael L. Dustin and Steven B. Abramson, NYU Langone Medical Center; and Xiu-Ping Yu, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan, China.


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Wei Tang, Yi Lu, Qing-Yun Tian, Yan Zhang, Feng-Jin Guo, Guang-Yi Liu, Nabeel Muzaffar Syed, Yongjie Lai, Edward Alan Lin, Li Kong, Jeffrey Su, Fangfang Yin, Ai-Hao Ding, Alexandra Zanin-Zhorov, Michael L. Dustin, Jian Tao, Joseph Craft, Zhinan Yin, Jian Q. Feng, Steven B. Abramson, Xiu-Ping Yu and Chuan-Ju Liu. The Growth Factor Progranulin Binds to TNF Receptors and Is Therapeutic Against Inflammatory Arthritis in Mice. Science, 10 March 2011 DOI: 10.1126/science.1199214

Cite This Page:

NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine. "Engineered protein has potential for new anti-inflamatory treatment." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 March 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110310141431.htm>.
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine. (2011, March 11). Engineered protein has potential for new anti-inflamatory treatment. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 6, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110310141431.htm
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine. "Engineered protein has potential for new anti-inflamatory treatment." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110310141431.htm (accessed July 6, 2015).

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