Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Insulation unit: Quiet area for sensitive devices

Date:
March 15, 2011
Source:
Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft
Summary:
Devices for precise analysis or manufacturing are very sensitive to ambient vibrations. Experts have now developed an insulation unit that actively counteracts these effects emanating from the environment.

Devices for precise analysis or manufacturing are very sensitive to ambient vibrations. The experts at Fraunhofer have developed an insulation unit that actively counteracts these effects emanating from the environment. This compact and flexible system can be viewed at the Hannover Messe trade fair (April 4-8 in Hanover) at the booth of the Fraunhofer Adaptronics Alliance.

It is difficult to write a letter on a driving bus, or to measure small distances on a vibrating plate -- the vibrations simply interfere too much. Any small vibration coming from the floor is already too much if there is an increased requirement with respect to accuracy. They hamper high-resolution measurements of distance or roughness -- as in scanning electron microscopy. They are also not desired in production if precision is a requirement. For this reason, the devices must be settled in such a manner that they are stable and quiet. Damping is necessary also when the machines/devices themselves vibrate and this movement is not supposed to be transferred to the flooring.

The adaptronics specialists of the Fraunhofer Adaptronics Alliance have developed an insulation unit that meets these requirements and is compact at the same time. With the help of piezo-electric ceramics, the researchers were able to integrate all necessary functions into a single, adaptronic component. It provides requisite rigidity, registers vibrations and counteracts them actively. This makes the unit superior to the current solutions for vibration insulation. In contrast to passive solutions -- for example, using rubber elements under machines -- the new solution works at even very low interference frequencies. However, traditional mechatronic insulation systems are able to do that as well. They actively attract the forces, just like the platform, and then counteract the movement, so to speak. Their disadvantage: they are comparatively large and consist of many components.

"One of the particular advantages in the insulation unit that we developed lies in the implemented digital control. This results in a particularly high flexibility, which cannot be achieved in this manner using analog controls," says Dr. Tobias Melz, managing director of the Fraunhofer Adaptronics Alliance. "The platform can be used not only for small machines or devices, but also for large ones, as it is relatively easy to adapt with respect to size. Our system can be implemented in such a compact and flexible manner that it could be integrated directly into the machines, for example into measuring instruments and production systems. The respective system need not be set up on a platform; rather, it is able to insulate itself from the vibration," explains Dipl.-Ing. Torsten Bartel, the responsible project manager at the Fraunhofer Institute for Structural Durability and System Reliability LBF.

Torsten Bartel and his colleagues are presenting the platform at work at the Hannover Messe: It already insulates against vibration in one spatial direction and two rotational movements. In addition, the experts are introducing an element that makes it possible to achieve damping effects in additional spatial directions. In the future, they want to expand the platform such that it will dampen all six directional movements of the setup machine/device.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft. "Insulation unit: Quiet area for sensitive devices." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 March 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110315093840.htm>.
Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft. (2011, March 15). Insulation unit: Quiet area for sensitive devices. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110315093840.htm
Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft. "Insulation unit: Quiet area for sensitive devices." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110315093840.htm (accessed September 19, 2014).

Share This



More Matter & Energy News

Friday, September 19, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

MIT BioSuit A New Take On Traditional Spacesuits

MIT BioSuit A New Take On Traditional Spacesuits

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) The MIT BioSuit could be an alternative to big, bulky traditional spacesuits, but the concept needs some work. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Virtual Reality Headsets Unveiled at Tokyo Game Show

Virtual Reality Headsets Unveiled at Tokyo Game Show

AFP (Sep. 18, 2014) Several companies unveiled virtual reality headsets at the Tokyo Game Show, Asia's largest digital entertainment exhibition. Duration: 00:48 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Apple's iOS8 Includes New 'Killswitch' To Curb Theft

Apple's iOS8 Includes New 'Killswitch' To Curb Theft

Newsy (Sep. 18, 2014) Apple's new operating system, iOS 8, comes with Apple's killswitch feature already activated, unlike all the models before it. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Stocks Hit All-Time High as Fed Holds Steady

Stocks Hit All-Time High as Fed Holds Steady

AP (Sep. 17, 2014) The Federal Reserve signaled Wednesday that it plans to keep a key interest rate at a record low because a broad range of U.S. economic measures remain subpar. Stocks hit an all-time high on the news. (Sept. 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins