Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Russian women have more pollutants in their breast milk than Norwegian women

Date:
March 22, 2011
Source:
Norwegian School of Veterinary Science
Summary:
Russian women living in Northwest Russia are more exposed to environmental toxins than Norwegian women. In spite of this, the researcher who did the study urges Russian women to breastfeed their babies.

Russian women living in Northwest Russia are more exposed to environmental toxins than Norwegian women. In spite of this, PhD candidate Anuschka Polder urges Russian women to breastfeed their babies.

Related Articles


Anuschka Polder's doctoral research has charted the levels of environmental toxins, or pollutants, in the breast milk of Norwegian and Russian women respectively. Her study also charts pollutants in foodstuffs from Russia. In some places in Northwest Russia, she discovered that the pollutants HCB, DDT and HCH occurred in breast milk to a much greater degree than in Norway. Due to their diet and their place of residence near areas of heavy industry, the population in Northwest Russia is more exposed to pollutants than the population of Norway.

POPs are passed from mother to child

Due to their fat-solluble properties, persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and other chemicals can accumulate as they progress up the nutrition chain to humans. These substances are absorbed into our fatty tissues and can be transmitted to the fetus and to infants via breast milk. Many POPs are thought to have a detrimental effect on the human immune defence system, reproduction and the development of the nervous system.

Food is the most important source of exposure to POPs. In addition, the working environment, proximity to industries and combating such diseases as malaria can expose humans to POPs. Factors such as ethnicity, age, number of children and smoking can influence the level of POPs in humans. In Russia, a connection was found between the level of POPs and industrial pollution. In both countries, clear links were also found between the level of POPs and age/the number of children.

Increased intake via food

The cold climate in Arctic regions leads to a general high intake of fat and thereby an increased intake of POPs via food. This connection was confirmed by Polder's doctoral research. The supply of foodstuffs or animal fodder from southern regions of Russia to Northern Russia is probably the cause of an increased level of DDT in the population.

DDT is a substance that according to the World Health Organisation (WHO) is still permitted in malaria-infested areas, but which has been prohibited for use as a pesticide in the West since the 1980s. Polder has studied the level of pollutants in Russian foodstuffs and discovered that the consumption of fish, dairy products, eggs and meat products was the greatest cause of a high level of POPs in Russian women.

Breastfeeding recommended

Even though some of the pollutants in breast milk revealed higher values than those recommended by JEFCA (Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives), a strong reduction in the level of pollutants was shown in breast milk both in Norway and Russia during the period from 1993 to 2002. This is regarded as a positive consequence of international measures implemented to reduce the production and use of chemicals which can be potential pollutants. Polder concludes that she supports WHO's recommendation that women should feed their babies on only breast milk for the first six months.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Norwegian School of Veterinary Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Norwegian School of Veterinary Science. "Russian women have more pollutants in their breast milk than Norwegian women." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 March 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110322105742.htm>.
Norwegian School of Veterinary Science. (2011, March 22). Russian women have more pollutants in their breast milk than Norwegian women. ScienceDaily. Retrieved February 28, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110322105742.htm
Norwegian School of Veterinary Science. "Russian women have more pollutants in their breast milk than Norwegian women." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110322105742.htm (accessed February 28, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, February 28, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Could a $34 Smartphone Device Improve HIV Diagnosis in Africa?

Could a $34 Smartphone Device Improve HIV Diagnosis in Africa?

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Feb. 27, 2015) A dongle that plugs into a Smartphone mimics a lab-based blood test for HIV and syphilis and can detect the diseases in 15 minutes, say researchers. Tara Cleary reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor Says Head Transplants Possible Within Two Years

Doctor Says Head Transplants Possible Within Two Years

Buzz60 (Feb. 27, 2015) An Italian doctor is saying he could stick someone&apos;s head onto someone else&apos;s body. Patrick Jones (@Patrick_E_Jones) reports. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Your Dentist Could Help Screen You For Diabetes

How Your Dentist Could Help Screen You For Diabetes

Newsy (Feb. 27, 2015) A new study from researchers at New York University suggests dentists could soon use blood samples taken from patients&apos; mouths to test for diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Best Tips to Makeover Your Health

The Best Tips to Makeover Your Health

Buzz60 (Feb. 27, 2015) If you&apos;re looking to boost your health this season, there are a few quick and easy steps to prompt you for success. Krystin Goodwin (@Krystingoodwin) has the best tips to give your health a makeover this spring! Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins