Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Most family medicine residencies restrict interactions between trainees, industry, survey finds

Date:
March 24, 2011
Source:
Georgetown University Medical Center
Summary:
A national survey of US family medicine residency programs finds that most limit pharmaceutical and other industry interactions with residents while many exclude all interactions. The results suggest a major shift away from acceptance of food, gifts, samples, and industry-supported events.

A national survey of U.S. family medicine residency programs finds that most limit pharmaceutical and other industry interactions with residents while many exclude all interactions. The results, published in the May issue of Academic Medicine, suggest a major shift away from acceptance of food, gifts, samples, and industry-supported events.

Related Articles


The survey was a joint effort between Georgetown University Medical Center and the American Medical Student Association (AMSA).

There are more than 400 accredited family medicine residency programs in the country . responsible for training family medicine physicians. Previous studies suggest that almost all physicians-in-training (medical students and residents) have interacted in some way with pharmaceutical, medical device or biotechnology companies. Research shows that interactions -- meeting with representatives; accepting gifts, food, and samples; and sponsored talks -- between industry and trainees, as they develop their practice habits, -- -- affect prescribing patterns.

"There isn't any evidence that pharmaceutical representatives provide objective information to trainees," says Adriane Fugh-Berman, M.D., a professor of pharmacology at Georgetown University Medical Center. "To the contrary, studies have shown that the information they provide favors targeted drugs and that many assertions reps make are inconsistent with FDA-approved prescribing information."

In 2008, study authors sent our a four-question survey to the directors or coordinators of all 460 accredited family medicine residency programs.

The survey comprised the following questions:

  1. Does the residency allow gifts from industry or industry-supported food?
  2. Are drug samples accepted?
  3. Are industry representatives allowed access to medical students and/or residents at the family medicine center?
  4. Are any industry-sponsored residency activities allowed?

Additional space was provided on the survey for comments.

More than half (62.2 percent) of the programs submitted a response. Among responding family medicine residency programs, 52.1 percent reported that they refused drug samples, 48.6 percent disallowed industry gifts or food, 68.5 percent did not allow industry-sponsored residency activities, and 44.1 percent denied industry access to students and residents at the family medicine center.

Seventy-five residencies (26.2 percent) were designated as "pharma-free," meaning they didn't allow any of the activities described.

"Family medicine is leading the way in closing the door on pharma," Fugh-Berman says. "We were surprised that so many residencies were refusing all industry perks." She adds that a 1992 study found that 90 percent of family medicine residencies allowed industry support.

"Our survey allowed for comments so we know that some residency programs report recent changes in plans or practices to limit industry interaction. Although some faculty and some residents are opposed to these limits, it's clear that industry influence on family medicine residencies is waning."

The study's authors concluded that industry interactions can have adverse effects on rational prescribing and residency programs should assess the benefits and harms of these relationships.

Fugh-Berman is director of PharmedOut and serves as a paid expert witness on behalf of plaintiffs in litigation regarding pharmaceutical marketing practices. Based at Georgetown University Medical Center, PharmedOut is a project of volunteer students and health professionals who promote evidence-based prescribing, educate health care professionals about pharmaceutical marketing practices, and provide access to unbiased information about medications.

This work received no funding. PharmedOut donated pizza for volunteers and the AMSA donated postage for mailing. The authors report having no personal financial interests related to the study.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Georgetown University Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Adriane Fugh-Berman, Steven R. Brown, Rachel Trippett, Alicia M. Bell, Paige Clark, Anthony Fleg, Jay Siwek. Closing the Door on Pharma? A National Survey of Family Medicine Residencies Regarding Industry Interactions. Academic Medicine, 2011; 1 DOI: 10.1097/ACM.0b013e318212e8d4

Cite This Page:

Georgetown University Medical Center. "Most family medicine residencies restrict interactions between trainees, industry, survey finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 March 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110324181736.htm>.
Georgetown University Medical Center. (2011, March 24). Most family medicine residencies restrict interactions between trainees, industry, survey finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 1, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110324181736.htm
Georgetown University Medical Center. "Most family medicine residencies restrict interactions between trainees, industry, survey finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110324181736.htm (accessed March 1, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, March 1, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Rehab Robot Helps Restore Damaged Muscles and Nerves

Rehab Robot Helps Restore Damaged Muscles and Nerves

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Mar. 1, 2015) A rehabilitation robot prototype to help restore deteriorated nerves and muscles using electromyography and computer games. Ben Gruber reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could a $34 Smartphone Device Improve HIV Diagnosis in Africa?

Could a $34 Smartphone Device Improve HIV Diagnosis in Africa?

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Feb. 27, 2015) A dongle that plugs into a Smartphone mimics a lab-based blood test for HIV and syphilis and can detect the diseases in 15 minutes, say researchers. Tara Cleary reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor Says Head Transplants Possible Within Two Years

Doctor Says Head Transplants Possible Within Two Years

Buzz60 (Feb. 27, 2015) An Italian doctor is saying he could stick someone&apos;s head onto someone else&apos;s body. Patrick Jones (@Patrick_E_Jones) reports. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Your Dentist Could Help Screen You For Diabetes

How Your Dentist Could Help Screen You For Diabetes

Newsy (Feb. 27, 2015) A new study from researchers at New York University suggests dentists could soon use blood samples taken from patients&apos; mouths to test for diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins