Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Pig stem cell transplants: The key to future research into retina treatment

Date:
April 15, 2011
Source:
Wiley-Blackwell
Summary:
Scientists studying the role of stem cells in repairing damaged retina tissue have found that pigs represent an effective proxy species to research treatments for humans. The study demonstrates how stem cells can be isolated and transplanted between pigs, overcoming a key barrier to the research.

A team of American and Chinese scientists studying the role of stem cells in repairing damaged retina tissue have found that pigs represent an effective proxy species to research treatments for humans. The study, published in Stem Cells, demonstrates how stem cells can be isolated and transplanted between pigs, overcoming a key barrier to the research.

Treatments to repair the human retina following degenerative diseases remain a challenge for medical science. Unlike species of lower vertebrates the human retina lacks a regenerative pathway meaning that research has focused on cell transplantation.

"The retina is the light sensitive tissue surrounding the inner surface of the eye. Its outer layer is made up of rods and cone photoreceptor cells which convert light signals," said lead author Douglas Dean from the University of Louisville. "Traditionally transplant studies have focused on mice and other rodents because of the variety of genetic material they represent, however mouse retina tissue is rod dominant, which is significantly different to the human eye."

Dr Dean's team turned their attention to pigs because, as with humans, the swine eye contains a cone dominant central visual streak, making it a closer anatomical and physiological match.

"Studies into swine models have been hampered in the past," said Dean, "because the induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) needed for such transplants have not been isolated from pigs, while their compatibility with a host's photoreceptor cells had not been demonstrated."

Dr Dean's team gathered iPSCs from swine skin fibroblasts and demonstrated that these cells differentiated in culture and could be integrated with the cells of a second pig's retina.

While only a small section of the retina was transplanted for this study the results could open a new avenue of research into degenerative conditions as researchers have a more effective human proxy species to work with.

"Our results demonstrate that swine stem cells can be integrated into a damaged swine neural retina," concluded Dean. "This research now lays a foundation for future studies of retinal stem cell transplantation in a swine model."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wiley-Blackwell. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Liang Zhou, Wei Wang, Yongqing Liu, Juan Fernandez de Castro, Toshihiko Ezashi, Bhanu Prakash V.L. Telugu, R. Michael Roberts, Henry J. Kaplan, Douglas C. Dean. Differentiation of Swine iPSC into Rod Photoreceptors and Their Integration into the Retina. Stem Cells, 2011; DOI: 10.1002/stem.637

Cite This Page:

Wiley-Blackwell. "Pig stem cell transplants: The key to future research into retina treatment." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 April 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110412201720.htm>.
Wiley-Blackwell. (2011, April 15). Pig stem cell transplants: The key to future research into retina treatment. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110412201720.htm
Wiley-Blackwell. "Pig stem cell transplants: The key to future research into retina treatment." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110412201720.htm (accessed July 23, 2014).

Share This




More Plants & Animals News

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Michigan Plant's Goal: Flower and Die

Michigan Plant's Goal: Flower and Die

AP (July 22, 2014) An 80-year-old agave plant, which is blooming for the first and only time at a University of Michigan conservatory, will die when it's done (July 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
San Diego Zoo Welcomes New, Rare Rhino Calf

San Diego Zoo Welcomes New, Rare Rhino Calf

Reuters - US Online Video (July 21, 2014) An endangered black rhino baby is the newest resident at the San Diego Zoo. Sasha Salama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Shark Sightings a Big Catch for Cape Tourism

Shark Sightings a Big Catch for Cape Tourism

AP (July 21, 2014) A rise in shark sightings along the shores of Chatham, Massachusetts is driving a surge of eager vacationers to the beach town looking to catch a glimpse of a great white. (July 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
$23.6 Billion Awarded To Widow In Smoking Lawsuit

$23.6 Billion Awarded To Widow In Smoking Lawsuit

Newsy (July 20, 2014) Cynthia Robinson claims R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company hid the health and addiction risks of its products, leading to the death of her husband in 1996. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins