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Using living cells as an 'invisibility cloak' to hide drugs

Date:
June 16, 2011
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
The quest for better ways of encapsulating medicine so that it can reach diseased parts of the body has led scientists to harness -- for the first time -- living human cells to produce natural capsules with channels for releasing drugs and diagnostic agents.

The quest for better ways of encapsulating medicine so that it can reach diseased parts of the body has led scientists to harness -- for the first time -- living human cells to produce natural capsules with channels for releasing drugs and diagnostic agents. The report appears in ACS' journal Nano Letters.

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In the report, Dayang Wang and colleagues explain that the human body is very efficient at getting rid of foreign substances. Some foreign substances, such as viruses, are harmful and should be removed. But the body also considers drugs and nanoparticles -- meant to treat diseases and allow physicians to see cells and organs -- to be foreign objects, and they are also quickly removed. To help these substances stay in the body longer, scientists have tried to fool it by encapsulating these substances in coatings that more closely resemble natural cells. Over the years, researchers have tested many different artificial coatings, but they failed to stay in the body for very long. So, Wang and colleagues set out to make a better capsule -- by using living cells as an "invisibility cloak."

Because the group's so-called "cell membrane capsules" (CMCs) were made from real living cells, they tricked the body into thinking they were supposed to be there. Thus, drugs and nanoparticles inside CMCs stayed in the body much longer than those inside other encapsulation materials. "Hence the CMCs provide the first intrinsically biocompatible and functional drug delivery and release vehicles," say the researchers.

The authors acknowledge funding from the Max Planck Society and Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Zhengwei Mao, Regis Cartier, Anja Hohl, Maura Farinacci, Anca Dorhoi, Tich-Lam Nguyen, Paul Mulvaney, John Ralston, Stefan H. E. Kaufmann, Helmuth Möhwald, Dayang Wang. Cells as Factories for Humanized Encapsulation. Nano Letters, 2011; 110412134243000 DOI: 10.1021/nl200801n

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Using living cells as an 'invisibility cloak' to hide drugs." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 June 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110615103046.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2011, June 16). Using living cells as an 'invisibility cloak' to hide drugs. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110615103046.htm
American Chemical Society. "Using living cells as an 'invisibility cloak' to hide drugs." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110615103046.htm (accessed December 18, 2014).

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