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Seaweed as a rich new source of heart-healthy food ingredients

Date:
July 21, 2011
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
In an article that may bring smiles to the faces of vegetarians who consume no dairy products and vegans, who consume no animal-based foods, scientists have identified seaweed as a rich new potential source of heart-healthy food ingredients. Seaweed and other "macroalgae" could rival milk products as sources of these so-called "bioactive peptides."

Kelp. Scientists have identified seaweed as a rich new potential source of heart-healthy food ingredients.
Credit: © Quasarphoto / Fotolia

In an article that may bring smiles to the faces of vegetarians who consume no dairy products and vegans, who consume no animal-based foods, scientists have identified seaweed as a rich new potential source of heart-healthy food ingredients. Seaweed and other "macroalgae" could rival milk products as sources of these so-called "bioactive peptides," they conclude in an article in ACS's Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Maria Hayes and colleagues Ciarαn Fitzgerald, Eimear Gallagher and Deniz Tasdemir note increased interest in using bioactive peptides, now obtained mainly from milk products, as ingredients in so-called functional foods. Those foods not only provide nutrition, but have a medicine-like effect in treating or preventing certain diseases. Seaweeds are a rich but neglected alternative source, they state, noting that people in East Asian and other cultures have eaten seaweed for centuries: Nori in Japan, dulse in coastal Europe, and limu palahalaha in native Hawaiian cuisine.

Their review of almost 100 scientific studies concluded that that some seaweed proteins work just like the bioactive peptides in milk products to reduce blood pressure almost like the popular ACE inhibitor drugs. "The variety of macroalga species and the environments in which they are found and their ease of cultivation make macroalgae a relatively untapped source of new bioactive compounds, and more efforts are needed to fully exploit their potential for use and delivery to consumers in food products," Hayes and her colleagues conclude.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Ciarán Fitzgerald, Eimear Gallagher, Deniz Tasdemir, Maria Hayes. Heart Health Peptides from Macroalgae and Their Potential Use in Functional Foods. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 2011; 59 (13): 6829 DOI: 10.1021/jf201114d

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Seaweed as a rich new source of heart-healthy food ingredients." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 July 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110720142346.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2011, July 21). Seaweed as a rich new source of heart-healthy food ingredients. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110720142346.htm
American Chemical Society. "Seaweed as a rich new source of heart-healthy food ingredients." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110720142346.htm (accessed September 18, 2014).

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