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Landsat satellites track continued Missouri River flooding

Date:
July 20, 2011
Source:
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center
Summary:
Flooding along the Missouri River continues as shown in recent Landsat satellite images of the Nebraska and Iowa border. Heavy rains and snowmelt have caused the river to remain above flood stage for an extended period.

Flooding down the Missouri River continues along the Nebraska and Iowa border as shown in this Landsat 7 satellite image of July 17, 2011. Heavy rains and snowmelt have caused record flows. Green represents vegetation, dark blue is water.
Credit: USGS/NASA

Flooding along the Missouri River continues as shown in recent Landsat satellite images of the Nebraska and Iowa border. Heavy rains and snowmelt have caused the river to remain above flood stage for an extended period.

A Landsat 5 image of the area from May 5, 2011 shows normal flow. In contrast, a Landsat 7 image from July 17 depicts flood conditions in the same location.

A national overview map of streamflow provided by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) WaterWatch graphically portrays the immense geographic extent of flooding in the Missouri River basin.

Monitoring both floods and droughts, the USGS WaterWatch internet site displays maps, graphs, and tables that describe current and past streamflow conditions for the United States. The real-time streamflow data is generally updated on an hourly basis.

The Landsat Program is a series of Earth-observing satellite missions jointly managed by NASA and the U.S. Geological Survey. Landsat satellites have been consistently gathering data about our planet since 1972. They continue to improve and expand this unparalleled record of Earth's changing landscapes, for the benefit of all. The next Landsat satellite is scheduled to launch in December 2012.

For the USGS WaterWatch website, please visit: http://waterwatch.usgs.gov/new/index.php?id=ww

For more information about the Landsat launching in 2012: http://ldcm.gsfc.nasa.gov


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. "Landsat satellites track continued Missouri River flooding." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 July 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110720162041.htm>.
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. (2011, July 20). Landsat satellites track continued Missouri River flooding. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110720162041.htm
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. "Landsat satellites track continued Missouri River flooding." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110720162041.htm (accessed October 21, 2014).

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