Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Leukemia drug reverses tamoxifen-resistance in breast cancer cells

Date:
August 4, 2011
Source:
Thomas Jefferson University
Summary:
Taking a leukemia chemotherapy drug may help breast cancer patients who don't respond to tamoxifen overcome resistance to the widely-used drug, new research suggests.

Taking a leukemia chemotherapy drug may help breast cancer patients who don't respond to tamoxifen overcome resistance to the widely-used drug, new research from the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson suggests.

Related Articles


Interestingly, researchers found that taxoxifen combined with dasatinib, a protein-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, reverses the chemo-resistance caused by cancer-associated fibroblasts in the surrounding tissue by normalizing glucose intake and reducing mitochondrial oxidative stress, the process that fuels the cancer cells.

Previous animal studies have confirmed that combining tyrosine kinase inhibitors with anti-estrogen therapies, like tamoxifen, can prevent drug resistance, but none have suggested that the target of the inhibitors is the cancer-associated fibroblasts.

The researchers report their findings in the August 1 issue of Cell Cycle.

About 70 percent of women diagnosed with breast cancer will have estrogen receptor positive (ER(+)) disease, which indicates that the tumor may respond to tamoxifen. However, a large percentage of these tumors -- up to 35 percent -- have little to no response to the drug or eventually develop resistance to it.

In this study, researchers sought to better understand drug resistance by looking at the metabolic basis in an ER (+) cell line and cancer-associated fibroblasts. The researchers have previously established a relationship between the two, where cancer cells induce aerobic glycolysis by secreting hydrogen peroxide in adjacent fibroblasts via oxidative stress. In turn, these fibroblasts provide nutrients to the cancer cells to proliferate, a process that ultimately makes tumors grow.

Here, they investigated and then demonstrated that this interaction was also the basis of tamoxifen resistance.

In a sense, the drug combination had an "antioxidant effect" in these types of cancer cells, according to Michael P. Lisanti, M.D., Ph.D., Professor and Chair of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine at Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University and a member of the Kimmel Cancer Center.

"The fibroblasts are what make ER (+) cancer cells resistant to the tamoxifen," said Dr. Lisanti. "But the tamoxifen plus dasatinib maintained both fibroblasts and cancer cells in a 'glycolytic state,' with minimal oxidative stress and more cell death, most likely because of an absence of metabolic coupling. The supply between the two was cut."

"This suggests resistance to chemotherapeutic agents is a metabolic and stromal phenomenal," he added.

Researchers showed that ER (+) cancer cells alone responded to tamoxifen but when co-cultured with human fibroblasts had little to no effect. Similarly, dasatinib, a chemotherapy drug used to treat leukemia patients who can no longer benefit from other medications, had no effect on fibroblasts alone or cancer cells. Together, however, the drugs prevented the cancer cells co-cultured with the fibroblasts from using high-energy nutrients from the fibroblasts.

This combination resulted in nearly 80 percent cell death, the team reported -- a two to three fold increase when compared with tamoxifen alone.

"The drugs have no effect when they are used alone -- it's in unison when they effectively kill the cancer cells in the presence of fibroblasts," said Dr. Lisanti. "This opens up the door for possible new treatment strategies. This 'synthetic lethality' may help patients overcome resistance in the clinic."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Thomas Jefferson University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Thomas Jefferson University. "Leukemia drug reverses tamoxifen-resistance in breast cancer cells." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 August 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110801120357.htm>.
Thomas Jefferson University. (2011, August 4). Leukemia drug reverses tamoxifen-resistance in breast cancer cells. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110801120357.htm
Thomas Jefferson University. "Leukemia drug reverses tamoxifen-resistance in breast cancer cells." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110801120357.htm (accessed December 22, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, December 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Christmas Kissing Good for Health

Christmas Kissing Good for Health

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 22, 2014) Scientists in Amsterdam say couples transfer tens of millions of microbes when they kiss, encouraging healthy exposure to bacteria. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Brain-Dwelling Tapeworm Reveals Genetic Secrets

Brain-Dwelling Tapeworm Reveals Genetic Secrets

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 22, 2014) Cambridge scientists have unravelled the genetic code of a rare tapeworm that lived inside a patient's brain for at least four year. Researchers hope it will present new opportunities to diagnose and treat this invasive parasite. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Americans Drink More in the Winter

Americans Drink More in the Winter

Buzz60 (Dec. 22, 2014) The BACtrack breathalyzer app analyzed Americans' blood alcohol content and found out a whole lot of interesting things about their drinking habits. Mara Montalbano (@maramontalbano) has more. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Touch-Free Smart Phone Empowers Mobility-Impaired

Touch-Free Smart Phone Empowers Mobility-Impaired

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) A touch-free phone developed in Israel enables the mobility-impaired to operate smart phones with just a movement of the head. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins