Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

How FluMist elicits protection

Date:
August 23, 2011
Source:
Trudeau Institute
Summary:
New research may help to explain why live attenuated influenza vaccine, commonly known as FluMist, elicits protection.

New research from the Trudeau Institute may help to explain why live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), commonly known as FluMist, elicits protection. The research is published in this month's issue of Vaccine. The journal article is entitled "Live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) impacts innate and adaptive immune responses" and was authored by Trudeau Institute scientist Dr. Laura Haynes and her colleagues.

"Our research specifically examines how the vaccine, which is commonly known as FluMist, elicits protection," said Dr. Laura Haynes. "Influenza infection normally induces a massive inflammatory response in the lungs that leads to significant illness and increases the susceptibility to secondary bacterial infections. The most efficient way to prevent influenza infection is through vaccination. To date, the mechanism of how FluMist induces protection has been unclear. Our study demonstrates that this vaccine works by inducing a very early non-specific immune response in the lungs in a mouse model of influenza infection."

The very early non-specific immune response sets the stage for the early influx of virus-specific immune cells, which are necessary for viral clearance. Importantly, this immune response is protective against both matching and non-matching influenza strains, therefore it could provide a level of protection in the case of a newly emergent influenza strain.

In addition, this very early immune response also serves to limit lung inflammation by significantly reducing the levels of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines produced following influenza infection. This novel finding provides insight into how this influenza vaccine functions and is important because inflammation is a major cause of damage in the lungs and this can set the stage for secondary bacterial infections, which are quite common following influenza infection.

The study goes on to show that the LAIV vaccine also induces a robust immune response in healthy adult volunteers. These translational experiments were carried out in collaboration with the Respiratory Diseases Research Department at the Naval Health Research Center (NHRC) in San Diego, CA and were the result of a joint Trudeau/Department of Defense contract.

Subjects were recruited by NHRC and were administered the commercially available FluMist vaccine. At specific time points following vaccination, the immune response to the vaccine was examined. Following LAIV vaccination, chemokines and cytokines involved in virus-specific lymphocyte recruitment were produced. This is indicative of a protective immune response and would lead to the early recruitment of immune cells to the lung should influenza infection occur. Importantly, early recruitment of immune cells to the lung is highly desirable since this then leads to accelerated viral clearance and reduced levels of inflammation.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Trudeau Institute. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Paula A. Lanthier, Gail E. Huston, Amy Moquin, Sheri M. Eaton, Frank M. Szaba, Lawrence W. Kummer, Micheal P. Tighe, Jacob E. Kohlmeier, Patrick J. Blair, Michael Broderick, Stephen T. Smiley, Laura Haynes. Live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) impacts innate and adaptive immune responses. Vaccine, 2011; DOI: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2011.07.093

Cite This Page:

Trudeau Institute. "How FluMist elicits protection." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 August 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110823115159.htm>.
Trudeau Institute. (2011, August 23). How FluMist elicits protection. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110823115159.htm
Trudeau Institute. "How FluMist elicits protection." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110823115159.htm (accessed October 1, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Newsy (Oct. 1, 2014) A new study says children born less than one year and more than five years after a sibling can have an increased risk for autism. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robotic Hair Restoration

Robotic Hair Restoration

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) A new robotic procedure is changing the way we transplant hair. The ARTAS robot leaves no linear scarring and provides more natural results. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Insertable Cardiac Monitor

Insertable Cardiac Monitor

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) A heart monitor the size of a paperclip that can save your life. The “Reveal Linq” allows a doctor to monitor patients with A-Fib on a continuous basis for up to 3 years! Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Attacking Superbugs

Attacking Superbugs

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) Two weapons hospitals can use to attack superbugs. Scientists in Ireland created a new gel resistant to superbugs, and a robot that can disinfect a room in minutes. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins