Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Argentina's Santa Fe government reducing lead ammunition for sports hunters

Date:
September 1, 2011
Source:
Wildlife Conservation Society
Summary:
The Wildlife Conservation Society applauds the government of Santa Fe Province for taking steps to reduce the amount of lead ammunition used in hunting of waterfowl, the first such action of its kind in Argentina.

Dr. Hebe Ferreyra of the Wildlife Conservation Society holds a fulvous whistling duck, a native species in the wetlands of Santa Fe, Argentina. An ongoing study on the effects of lead on waterfowl in the landscape has resulted in a recent reduction in lead gunshot used by hunters.
Credit: M. Romano/Wildlife Conservation Society.

The Wildlife Conservation Society applauds the government of Santa Fe Province for taking steps to reduce the amount of lead ammunition used in hunting of waterfowl, the first such action of its kind in Argentina.

Enacted for this year's hunting season, the regulation requires hunters to reduce usage of lead shot by 25 percent. The regulation initiates a process that may lead to the eventual ban of lead shot. Lead is known to cause severe adverse effects on the health of animals and humans and permanently pollute the environment.

"This is a huge step forward," said Dr. Marcela Uhart of the Wildlife Conservation Society, the principal investigator in a project that is analyzing the impact of lead on native waterfowl and other wildlife in the Santa Fe Province. "We commend the government of Santa Fe for acting on the preliminary results of our study. This is the first such regulation in the country and, hopefully, it will serve as a model for other provinces to emulate."

Dr. Uhart's project examines the density of lead ammunition pellets in ducks' stomachs and wetlands where hunting occurs. Further, the study examines the damage of lead ammunition to other wildlife and to human health. So far, the research team has collected blood samples from 24 live ducks and tissue samples from about 300 ducks killed by hunters, as well as water, vegetation, and soil samples from areas with and without hunting activity. As expected, preliminary results have shown significant levels of lead in the gizzards, blood, and bones of tested ducks.

The study is conducted in collaboration with Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, and Universidad Nacional del Sur.

Santa Fe -- one of eight provinces in Argentina where hunting is permitted -- is a hotspot for recreational hunting, where sportsmen from around the world come to hunt waterfowl species such as the rosy-billed pochard and the fulvous whistling duck. Consequently, the hunting pressure on the region is high; it is estimated that more than 10 tons of lead are introduced into the ecosystems of Santa Fe every year.

The new regulation specifies that hunters must reduce the amount of lead shot cartridges by 25 percent when hunting rosy-billed pochards, fulvous whistling ducks, white-faced whistling ducks, and other species. It also enforces restrictions on the use of lead shot in the hunting of terrestrial bird species such as the eared dove, shiny cowbird, and chestnut-capped blackbird.

"The government of Santa Fe has set an admirable precedent in the reduction of lead ammunition in the province's hunting grounds, a move that will benefit the region's people and wildlife," said Dr. Robert Cook, Executive Vice President and General Director of WCS's Living Institutions. "We encourage other states and stakeholders to adopt the same process."

The study was funded by the Morris Animal Foundation.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wildlife Conservation Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Wildlife Conservation Society. "Argentina's Santa Fe government reducing lead ammunition for sports hunters." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 September 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110901095414.htm>.
Wildlife Conservation Society. (2011, September 1). Argentina's Santa Fe government reducing lead ammunition for sports hunters. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110901095414.htm
Wildlife Conservation Society. "Argentina's Santa Fe government reducing lead ammunition for sports hunters." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110901095414.htm (accessed July 28, 2014).

Share This




More Plants & Animals News

Monday, July 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Raw: Sea Turtle Hatchlings Emerge from Nest

Raw: Sea Turtle Hatchlings Emerge from Nest

AP (July 27, 2014) A live-streaming webcam catches loggerhead sea turtle hatchlings emerging from a nest in the Florida Keys. (July 27) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Trees Could Save More Than 850 Lives Each Year

Trees Could Save More Than 850 Lives Each Year

Newsy (July 27, 2014) A national study conducted by the USDA Forest Service found that trees collectively save more than 850 lives on an annual basis. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
What's To Blame For Worst Ebola Outbreak In History?

What's To Blame For Worst Ebola Outbreak In History?

Newsy (July 27, 2014) A U.S. doctor has tested positive for the deadly Ebola virus, as the worst-ever outbreak continues to grow. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
The New York Times Backs Pot Legalization

The New York Times Backs Pot Legalization

Newsy (July 27, 2014) The New York Times has officially endorsed the legalization of marijuana, but why now, and to what end? Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins