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How much should patients in intensive care eat?

Date:
October 4, 2011
Source:
Queen's University
Summary:
Patients who are fed more calories while in intensive care have lower mortality rates than those who receive less of their daily-prescribed calories, according to a recent study of data from the largest critical care nutrition database in the world.

Patients who are fed more calories while in intensive care have lower mortality rates than those who receive less of their daily-prescribed calories, according to a recent study of data from the largest critical care nutrition database in the world.

"Our finding is significant as there have been a number of previous studies in the area of critical care nutrition that have produced conflicting clinical recommendations and policy implications," says study lead Daren Heyland, a professor of Medicine at Queen's, director of the Clinical Evaluation Research Unit at Kingston General Hospital, and scientific director of the proposed Technology Evaluation in the Elderly Network. "Since caloric delivery is essential for improving the chances of these critically ill patients, it's vital that we know what the optimal level is."

Dr. Heyland's team examined the records of 7872 mechanically ventilated, artificially fed patients in 352 ICUs in 33 countries. They found that patients receiving at least two-thirds of their prescribed calorie intake had reduced mortality rates when compared with patients receiving less than one-third of their prescribed calorie intake. The researchers identified that the optimal caloric intake was about 80 to 85 per cent of total prescribed calorie intake.

World-wide, patients in ICUs typically receive 50 to 60 per cent of their prescribed calories so efforts to improve caloric delivery are important to improve the chances of critically ill patients surviving their illness.

In a further study, Dr Heyland and his research team examined the use of supplemental intravenous nutrition, in addition to the traditional use of feeding tubes. They concluded that efforts to improve the delivery of nutrition delivered via a feeding tube into the stomach are more important than the use of supplemental intravenous nutrition.

These respective findings were both recently published in Critical Care Medicine.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Queen's University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Daren K. Heyland, Naomi Cahill, Andrew G. Day. Optimal amount of calories for critically ill patients: Depends on how you slice the cake!. Critical Care Medicine, 2011; 1 DOI: 10.1097/CCM.0b013e318226641d

Cite This Page:

Queen's University. "How much should patients in intensive care eat?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 October 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111004154222.htm>.
Queen's University. (2011, October 4). How much should patients in intensive care eat?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111004154222.htm
Queen's University. "How much should patients in intensive care eat?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111004154222.htm (accessed April 17, 2014).

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