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First practical scientific test to date and authenticate priceless silk masterpieces

Date:
October 12, 2011
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
Scientists are reporting development of the first fast and reliable scientific method to determine the age and authenticity of priceless silk tapestries and other treasures -- such as Civil War General Phillip Sheridan's famous red-and-white battle flag -- in museums and other collections around the world.

Scientists are reporting development of the first fast and reliable scientific method to determine the age and authenticity of priceless silk tapestries and other treasures -- such as Civil War General Phillip Sheridan's famous red-and-white battle flag -- in museums and other collections around the world.

A report on their work appears in ACS' journal Analytical Chemistry.

Mehdi Moini and colleagues at the Smithsonian Institution point out that for thousands of years, silk fibers, consisting of natural protein unwound from the cocoons of the silkworm, have been woven into not just garments, but wall hangings, tapestries, carpets and painted silk artworks. Until now, however, there has been no practical scientific way to tell whether a silk tapestry is a well-preserved example from the Fontainebleu series from the 1540s or a copy made just last week. In many cases, scientists could not use the familiar carbon-14 dating process, because it involves taking samples of material large enough to cause visible damage to the silk object.

Their solution is a new test that tracks time-related deterioration the amino acid building blocks in silk protein. As silk ages, the so-called L-amino acids in its protein changed into so-called D-amino acids. The D/L ratio provides a highly accurate measure of a silk object's age, age to within 50-100 years and whether it is deteriorating and needs conservation work. Archaeologists had used the D/L approach to date ancient teeth and bone, but Moini's team simplified it and adapted it for silk.

The researchers demonstrated the test, called "CE-MS," on Sheridan's flag, a Fontainebleu tapestry, ancient silks from China and other old samples from masterpieces in museums around the world. The method only takes 20 minutes and requires only microscopic samples of silk -- a major improvement over the familiar carbon-14 dating method, which requires large samples that may cause visible damage to the object.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Mehdi Moini, Kathryn Klauenberg, Mary Ballard. Dating Silk By Capillary Electrophoresis Mass Spectrometry. Analytical Chemistry, 2011; 83 (19): 7577 DOI: 10.1021/ac201746u

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "First practical scientific test to date and authenticate priceless silk masterpieces." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 October 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111012113552.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2011, October 12). First practical scientific test to date and authenticate priceless silk masterpieces. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111012113552.htm
American Chemical Society. "First practical scientific test to date and authenticate priceless silk masterpieces." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111012113552.htm (accessed April 17, 2014).

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New Technique for Dating Silk

Sep. 13, 2011 For the first time, scientists have developed a fast and reliable method to date silk. This new technique, which is based on capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry, has great potential to ... read more
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