Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Response time to open arteries for most critical patients still too slow

Date:
November 22, 2011
Source:
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston
Summary:
Cardiologists are quick to point to statistics showing that the "door-to-balloon" treatment time for heart attack patients has dropped significantly in the past few years. But a retrospective study reveals that those who call 911 are most likely to have suffered a severe heart attack and despite receiving treatment quickly, they are still dying at unacceptable rates, say researchers.

Cardiologists are quick to point to statistics showing that the "door-to-balloon" treatment time for heart attack patients has dropped significantly in the past few years.

But a retrospective study reveals that those who call 911 are most likely to have suffered a severe heart attack and despite receiving treatment quickly, they are still dying at unacceptable rates, say researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Results from the large retrospective study were presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2011 by lead author James J. McCarthy, M.D., assistant professor of emergency medicine at the UTHealth Medical School and director of the Emergency Center at Memorial Hermann-Texas Medical Center.

Door-to-balloon refers to the period of time from a patient's arrival at the hospital to when a guidewire reaches the blockage and opens the artery with the inflation of a tiny balloon.

The results of the study revealed that patients who call 911 instead of transporting themselves to the emergency room arrive 30 minutes faster and have shorter door-to-balloon times (56 minutes versus 70). Unfortunately, in spite of this they are more likely to be in shock (10.7 percent versus 3.5), suffer heart failure (9.9 percent versus 6.3) by the time they get to the hospital and more likely to die during their hospitalization (7.2 percent versus 2.4).

"Those who call an ambulance are three times more likely to die because their disease is worse. They are much sicker," McCarthy said. "We suspect that it means they have a larger infarct (area of damage). It's a vulnerable population that despite rapid emergency medical services (EMS) and hospital care still has higher mortality"

Previous UTHealth research has shown that if the artery is unblocked in the first hour after a heart attack, there is minimal damage. After three hours, most of the damage has been done so UTHealth researchers have been concentrating on how to shorten that time to two hours or less.

The only way to lower the current time from symptoms to opening the artery is to treat the patient in the ambulance, McCarthy said. A year ago he presented results of a UTHealth clinical trial called Pre-Hospital Administration of Thrombolytic Therapy with Urgent Culprit Artery Revascularization (PATCAR). That trial showed that the mortality rate of patients arriving via EMS could be lowered to 2.9 percent by giving them a low dose of a clot-busting drug intravenously before they arrived at the hospital. The research was a collaboration of UTHealth, Memorial Hermann Heart & Vascular Institute-Texas Medical Center (HVI) and the Houston Fire Department.

"We know we've optimized the hospital system and integrated that with EMS but for the cohort that calls 911, that's still not enough," he said. "We need to figure out something else." The researchers are seeking additional funding to expand PATCAR to more patients.

The researchers looked at 37,715 patients in the American College of Cardiology's National Cardiovascular Data Registry. The presentation title is "EMS Transport of STEMI Patients Shortens Ischemic Times and is Associated with a Higher Risk Population: Results from the ACTION Registry."

Other UTHealth/Memorial Hermann HVI presenters at the conference are Richard Smalling, M.D., Ph.D., professor and director of interventional cardiovascular medicine; and Manuel Munoz Reyes, M.D., interventional cardiology clinical fellow.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. "Response time to open arteries for most critical patients still too slow." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 November 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/11/111116104621.htm>.
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. (2011, November 22). Response time to open arteries for most critical patients still too slow. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/11/111116104621.htm
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. "Response time to open arteries for most critical patients still too slow." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/11/111116104621.htm (accessed April 24, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Big Pharma Braces for M&A Wave

Big Pharma Braces for M&A Wave

Reuters - Business Video Online (Apr. 22, 2014) Big pharma on the move as Novartis boss, Joe Jimenez, tells Reuters about plans to transform his company via an asset exchange with GSK, and Astra Zeneca shares surge on speculation that Pfizer is looking for a takeover. Joanna Partridge reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Study Says Most Crime Not Linked To Mental Illness

Study Says Most Crime Not Linked To Mental Illness

Newsy (Apr. 22, 2014) A new study finds most crimes committed by people with mental illness are not caused by symptoms of their illness or disorder. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Hagel Gets Preview of New High-Tech Projects

Hagel Gets Preview of New High-Tech Projects

AP (Apr. 22, 2014) Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel is given hands-on demonstrations Tuesday of some of the newest research from DARPA _ the military's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency program. (April 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Smaller Plates And Cutlery Could Make You Feel Fuller

How Smaller Plates And Cutlery Could Make You Feel Fuller

Newsy (Apr. 22, 2014) NBC's "Today" conducted an experiment to see if changing the size of plates and utensils affects the amount individuals eat. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins