Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Treatment of silent acid reflux does not improve asthma in children, study finds

Date:
January 24, 2012
Source:
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute
Summary:
Adding the acid reflux drug lansoprazole to a standard inhaled steroid treatment for asthma does not improve asthma control in children who have no symptom of acid reflux, according to a new study. Lansoprazole therapy slightly increased the risk of sore throats and other respiratory problems in children, however.

Adding the acid reflux drug lansoprazole to a standard inhaled steroid treatment for asthma does not improve asthma control in children who have no symptom of acid reflux, according to a new study funded in part by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health. Lansoprazole therapy slightly increased the risk of sore throats and other respiratory problems in children, however.

Related Articles


Results of this study, which was also sponsored by the American Lung Association (ALA), appears Jan. 25 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

"This important finding could help prevent giving unnecessary medication to children," said Susan B. Shurin, M.D., acting director of the NHLBI and a board-certified pediatrician. "Doctors have suspected that acid reflux that does not cause symptoms interferes with asthma control and should be treated. This study shows that acid reflux medication should not be given to children for possible silent reflux in hopes of improving asthma control."

Shurin added that a previous NHLBI/ALA-funded trial from 2009 found that acid reflux drugs do not improve asthma control in adults who do not have symptoms of acid reflux.

Acid reflux occurs when stomach acid escapes to the adjoining esophagus. This condition occurs commonly in children and adults with asthma, although sometimes it can be silent and show none of the obvious symptoms such as heartburn, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing. Lansoprazole suppresses the production of stomach acid.

To test whether reflux treatment improves asthma control in children, researchers at 18 ALA Asthma Clinical Research Centers across the United States studied 306 children and teenagers of various ethnicities aged 6-17 years. All study participants had inadequately controlled asthma despite taking inhaled corticosteroids. Approximately 40 percent of tested participants were identified as having acid reflux. Each participant was randomly assigned to receive a daily dose of lansoprazole or an inactive placebo pill along with their inhaled steroid therapy.

After 24 weeks of treatment, there were no significant differences in severity of asthma symptoms, overall lung function, or asthma-related quality of life between the lansoprazole and placebo treatment groups. These similar results were seen both in the whole study group as well as among the study subgroup that was positively identified as having acid reflux.

Children in the lansoprazole group did report more frequent adverse effects such as sore throat (52 percent versus 39 percent in placebo), upper respiratory infection (63 percent versus 49 percent) and/or bronchitis (7 percent versus 2 percent).

"This study addresses an important knowledge gap identified in the asthma guidelines," noted James P. Kiley, Ph.D., director of the NHLBI's Division of Lung Diseases. "This study, as well as the previous reflux trial in adults, will inform future guidelines for the treatment of asthma."

In the United States, asthma affects more than 7 million children and teenagers under age 18 years. Asthma disproportionately affects minorities and those with lower incomes. There is no cure for asthma, but guideline-based treatment can help prevent symptoms and attacks (shortness of breath, wheezing, and chest tightness) and enable children with asthma to lead active lives. The lansoprazole and placebo used in the study was provided by its manufacturer, Takeda Pharmaceuticals, North America. In addition, GlaxoSmithKline provided Albuterol HFA, a bronchodilator that was used in the evaluation of study participants.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. J. T. Holbrook, R. A. Wise, B. D. Gold, K. Blake, E. D. Brown, M. Castro, A. J. Dozor, J. J. Lima, J. G. Mastronarde, M. M. Sockrider, W. G. Teague. Lansoprazole for Children With Poorly Controlled Asthma: A Randomized Controlled Trial. JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association, 2012; 307 (4): 373 DOI: 10.1001/jama.2011.2035
  2. F. D. Martinez. Children, Asthma, and Proton Pump Inhibitors: Costs and Perils of Therapeutic Creep. JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association, 2012; 307 (4): 406 DOI: 10.1001/jama.2012.33

Cite This Page:

NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. "Treatment of silent acid reflux does not improve asthma in children, study finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 January 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/01/120124184206.htm>.
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. (2012, January 24). Treatment of silent acid reflux does not improve asthma in children, study finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/01/120124184206.htm
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. "Treatment of silent acid reflux does not improve asthma in children, study finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/01/120124184206.htm (accessed November 27, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, November 27, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

AFP (Nov. 27, 2014) — The Ebola epidemic sweeping Sierra Leone is having a profound effect on the country's children, many of whom have been left without any family members to support them. Duration: 01:02 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Experimental Ebola Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Trial

Experimental Ebola Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Trial

Newsy (Nov. 27, 2014) — A recent test of a prototype Ebola vaccine generated an immune response to the disease in subjects. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) — Researchers in the United States are preparing to discover whether a drug commonly used in human organ transplants can extend the lifespan and health quality of pet dogs. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Newsy (Nov. 26, 2014) — Advances in prosthetics are making replacement body parts stronger and more lifelike than they’ve ever been. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

More Coverage


Addition of Proton Pump Inhibitor to Treatment of Poorly Controlled Asthma in Children Does Not Improve Symptoms

Jan. 24, 2012 — Children without symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux whose asthma was being poorly controlled with anti-inflammatory treatment did not have an improvement in symptoms or lung function with the added ... read more

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins