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Bubble-powered microrockets zoom have potential to zoom through the human stomach, other acidic environments

Date:
February 8, 2012
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
Scientists have developed a new kind of tiny motor -- which they term a "microrocket" -- that can propel itself through acidic environments, such as the human stomach, without any external energy source, opening the way to a variety of medical and industrial applications. Their report describes the microrockets traveling at virtual warp speed for such devices. A human moving at the same speed would have to run at a clip of 400 miles per hour.

Illustration of a new kind of tiny motor — termed a “microrocket” — that can propel itself through acidic environments.
Credit: ACS

Scientists have developed a new kind of tiny motor -- which they term a "microrocket" -- that can propel itself through acidic environments, such as the human stomach, without any external energy source, opening the way to a variety of medical and industrial applications. Their report in the Journal of the American Chemical Society describes the microrockets traveling at virtual warp speed for such devices. A human moving at the same speed would have to run at a clip of 400 miles per hour.

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Joseph Wang and colleagues explain that self-propelled nano- or microscale motors could have applications in targeted drug delivery or imaging in humans or as a way to monitor industrial applications, such as semiconductor processing. However, some versions of these small-scale motors are not self-propelled and require the addition of a fuel (commonly hydrogen peroxide). Other versions cannot withstand extreme environments such as the stomach, which is very acidic. That's why the researchers developed a new, tubular microrocket that can move itself without added fuels in very acidic conditions.

They tested the new microrocket in various acids and in acidified human blood serum. In such environments, a microrocket spontaneously produces bubbles of hydrogen gas, which propels it like the gases spewing out of a rocket's motor nozzle. The microrocket is ultrafast -- it can move farther than 100 times its 0.0004-inch length in just one second. In contrast to current devices of this kind, the microrocket's interior is lined with zinc, which is more biocompatible and "greener" than other materials and leads to the generation of the hydrogen bubbles. Wang's team also developed a version with a magnetic layer, which enabled them to guide the microrockets toward cargo for pick-up, transport and release.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Wei Gao, Aysegul Uygun, Joseph Wang. Hydrogen-Bubble-Propelled Zinc-Based Microrockets in Strongly Acidic Media. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 2012; 134 (2): 897 DOI: 10.1021/ja210874s

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Bubble-powered microrockets zoom have potential to zoom through the human stomach, other acidic environments." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 February 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/02/120208132601.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2012, February 8). Bubble-powered microrockets zoom have potential to zoom through the human stomach, other acidic environments. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 4, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/02/120208132601.htm
American Chemical Society. "Bubble-powered microrockets zoom have potential to zoom through the human stomach, other acidic environments." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/02/120208132601.htm (accessed March 4, 2015).

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