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Unique Neandertal arm morphology due to scraping, not spearing

Date:
July 18, 2012
Source:
Public Library of Science
Summary:
Unique arm morphology in Neandertals was likely caused by scraping activities such as hide preparation, not spear thrusting as previously theorized, according to new research.

Unique arm morphology in Neandertals was likely caused by scraping activities such as hide preparation, not spear thrusting as previously theorized, according to research published July 18 in the open access journal PLoS ONE.

The researchers, led by Colin Shaw of the University of Cambridge, took muscle measurements of modern men performing three different spear thrusting tasks and four different scraping tasks. They found that muscle activity was significantly higher on the left side of the body for spear thrusting tasks relative to the right side of the body. This does not explain the observed Neandertal morphology, though, which shows dominant strength on the right side, casting doubt on the hypothesis that spear thrusting was responsible for the observed asymmetry.

When the study participants performed scraping tasks, however, the activity was much higher on their right side compared to their left, suggesting that scraping behavior may be the actual source of the arm morphology asymmetry and offering interesting insight into Neandertal behavior.

Shaw explains, "The skeletal remains of Neandertals suggests that they were doing something intense or repetitive, or both, that significantly impacted their lives. While hunting was important to Neandertals, our research suggests that much of their time was spent performing other tasks, such as preparing the skins of large animals. If we are right, it changes our picture of the daily activities of Neandertals."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Public Library of Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Shaw CN, Hofmann CL, Petraglia MD, Stock JT, Gottschall JS. Neandertal Humeri May Reflect Adaptation to Scraping Tasks, but Not Spear Thrusting. PLoS ONE, 2012; 7 (7): e40349 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0040349

Cite This Page:

Public Library of Science. "Unique Neandertal arm morphology due to scraping, not spearing." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 July 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120718192007.htm>.
Public Library of Science. (2012, July 18). Unique Neandertal arm morphology due to scraping, not spearing. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120718192007.htm
Public Library of Science. "Unique Neandertal arm morphology due to scraping, not spearing." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120718192007.htm (accessed September 21, 2014).

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