Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Prosthetic implant under development

Date:
July 26, 2012
Source:
University of Utah
Summary:
Thousands of veterans and warfighters returning to the U.S. suffer with limb amputations, and for many, standard prosthetics are not an option. Skin issues or short remaining-limb length can cause amputees to forgo the typical socket-type attachment systems. Researchers are now offering hope to amputees for a permanent limb replacement.

A new implantable prosthetic device is being developed by researchers at the University of Utah and George E. Wahlen Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center.
Credit: Photo courtesy of Technology Venture Development

Thousands of veterans and warfighters returning to the U.S. suffer with limb amputations, and for many, standard prosthetics are not an option. Skin issues or short remaining-limb length can cause amputees to forgo the typical socket-type attachment systems.

A team of researchers and surgeons from the University of Utah and the George E. Wahlen Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center in Salt Lake City hope to provide an alternative solution via osseointegrated direct skeletal attachment of prosthetic limbs for these veterans and the many others with a similar condition. For the last six years, this team has been developing a device that can be implanted directly into a person's residual bone, passing through the skin, so they can securely attach a prosthetic limb without the need for a socket.

"We are trying desperately to provide relief to the many veterans who have lost a limb," says Roy Bloebaum, professor of orthopaedics at the University of Utah and the director of the VA Bone and Joint Research Lab. "Most of these people are very young and have many years to live. Our goal is to give them back all of the abilities they had before they were injured."

Nothing like it has been done at a U.S. hospital, and the procedure has only been attempted an estimated 250 times worldwide in Europe and Australia, with mixed results.

Bloebaum is working with two other University of Utah professors -- Kent Bachus, an engineer and a professor of orthopaedics and director of the Orthopaedic Research Lab at the university, and Peter Beck, an orthopaedic surgeon and adjunct professor of orthopaedics.

Their research recently hit two milestones. One was a partnership with DJO Surgical, a global developer, manufacturer and distributor of medical devices, which has licensed the implant technology and is assisting with the remaining research and development. The other milestone was being accepted into a new Food and Drug Administration program that allows them to design a human early feasibility study. DJO Surgical applied for the FDA study and is responsible for managing its implementation.

The early feasibility study will last up to three years. During that time, the clinical research team will implant their device into 10 patients. A unique element will be the ability to develop and refine their device between operations, which should accelerate the overall refinement process by compressing the development cycle.

"We have already addressed some of the major research challenges with osseointegrated implant devices" Bachus says.

Researchers studying these implants have faced three fundamental problems -- getting the bone to grow into the device, preventing infection and determining how to address the skin interface.

Researchers believe they have already addressed most of these problems, as the solutions lie in the design of their device and the materials used. Specifically, the titanium device is integral to its success because it is coated with a porous titanium material called P2 (P squared), which is a proprietary coating that is owned by DJO. Skin and bone grows into the material, forming a secure bond.

Bloebaum, Bachus and Beck still have a long way to go before U.S. hospitals will be offering their implant prosthesis. They are currently working to secure $5 million in grants and partnerships like the one with DJO.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Utah. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Utah. "Prosthetic implant under development." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 July 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120726142052.htm>.
University of Utah. (2012, July 26). Prosthetic implant under development. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120726142052.htm
University of Utah. "Prosthetic implant under development." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120726142052.htm (accessed July 24, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Condemned Man's US Execution Takes Nearly Two Hours

Condemned Man's US Execution Takes Nearly Two Hours

AFP (July 24, 2014) America's death penalty debate raged Thursday after it took nearly two hours for Arizona to execute a prisoner who lost a Supreme Court battle challenging the experimental lethal drug cocktail. Duration: 00:55 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
China's Ageing Millions Look Forward to Bleak Future

China's Ageing Millions Look Forward to Bleak Future

AFP (July 24, 2014) China's elderly population is expanding so quickly that children struggle to look after them, pushing them to do something unexpected in Chinese society- move their parents into a nursing home. Duration: 02:07 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Hundreds in Virginia Turn out for a Free Clinic to Manage Health

Hundreds in Virginia Turn out for a Free Clinic to Manage Health

AFP (July 24, 2014) America may be the world’s richest country, but in terms of healthcare, the World Health Organisation ranks it 37th - prompting hundreds in Virginia to turn out for a free clinic run by “Remote Area Medical”. Duration 02:40 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Idaho Boy Helps Brother With Disabilities Complete Triathlon

Idaho Boy Helps Brother With Disabilities Complete Triathlon

Newsy (July 23, 2014) An 8-year-old boy helped his younger brother, who has a rare genetic condition that's confined him to a wheelchair, finish a triathlon. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

    Health News

      Environment News

        Technology News



          Save/Print:
          Share:

          Free Subscriptions


          Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

          Get Social & Mobile


          Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

          Have Feedback?


          Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
          Mobile: iPhone Android Web
          Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
          Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
          Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins