Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Mending a broken heart -- with a molecule that turns stem cells into heart cells

Date:
August 2, 2012
Source:
Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute
Summary:
Scientists have long been looking for a source of heart cells to study cardiac function or perhaps even to replace damaged tissue in heart disease patients. To do this, many are looking to stem cells. Scientists now describe how they uncovered ITD-1, a molecule that generates unlimited numbers of new heart cells from stem cells.

These are cardiomyocytes (heart muscle cells) generated from stem cells and expressing a green fluorescent protein.
Credit: Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute

For years, scientists have been looking for a good source of heart cells that can be used to study cardiac function in the lab, or perhaps even to replace diseased or damaged tissue in heart disease patients. To do this, many are looking to stem cells. Researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (Sanford-Burnham), the Human BioMolecular Research Institute, and ChemRegen, Inc. have been searching for molecules that convert stem cells to heart cells for about eight years -- and now they've found one.

Related Articles


Writing in the August 3 issue of Cell Stem Cell, the team describes how they sifted through a large collection of drug-like chemicals and uncovered ITD-1, a molecule that can be used to generate unlimited numbers of new heart cells from stem cells.

"Heart disease is the leading cause of death in this country. Because we can't replace lost cardiac muscle, the condition irreversibly leads to a decline in heart function and ultimately death. The only way to effectively replace lost heart muscle cells -- called cardiomyocytes -- is to transplant the entire heart," said Mark Mercola, Ph.D., director of Sanford-Burnham's Muscle Development and Regeneration Program and senior author of the study. "Using a drug to create new heart muscle from stem cells would be far more appealing than heart transplantation."

Searching for a needle in a haystack

Stem cells are important because they do two unique things --

1) self-renew, producing more stem cells and

2) differentiate, becoming other, more specialized cell types.

To obtain a large number of a certain cell type, such as heart cells, the hard part is figuring out the signals that direct them to become the desired cell type.

Mercola's group has been hunting for heart-inducing signals for 15 years -- in embryos and in stem cells. To find a synthetic molecule that might one day lead to a drug therapy to regenerate the heart, they joined forces with a team of medicinal chemists at the Human BioMolecular Research Institute led by John Cashman, Ph.D. With funding from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, they used sophisticated robotic technology to methodically test a large collection of drug-like chemicals, looking for that needle in a haystack that, when added to stem cells, results in cardiomyocytes. The winning compound was ITD-1.

Therapeutic applications

There's no shortage of therapeutic possibilities for ITD-1. "This particular molecule could be useful to enhance stem cell differentiation in a damaged heart," explained Erik Willems, Ph.D., postdoctoral researcher in Mercola's lab and first author of the study. "At some point, it could become the basis for a new therapeutic drug for cardiovascular disease -- one that would likely limit scar spreading in heart failure and promote new muscle formation."

Mercola, Willems, and Cashman are now working with San Diego biotech company ChemRegen, Inc. to further develop ITD-1 into a drug that one day might be used to treat patients.

More scientific detail

The researchers discovered that ITD-1 blocks a cellular process known as TGFϐ signaling. TGFϐ (short for transforming growth factor-ϐ) is a protein produced by one cell type to influence others' behaviors, such as proliferation, scarring, and even stem cell differentiation. TGFϐ works from outside the cell, binding to a receptor on the surface of a responding cell to initiate an intracellular signaling cascade that causes genes to be switched on or off, ultimately altering cellular behavior -- in this case making heart muscle.

ITD-1 triggers degradation of the TGFϐ receptor, thus inhibiting the whole process. With TGFϐ signaling turned off, stem cells are set on a course toward cardiogenesis. ITD-1 is the first selective inhibitor of TGFϐ, meaning that it might also have applications in many other processes controlled by TGFϐ.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Erik Willems, Joaquim Cabral-Teixeira, Dennis Schade, Wenqing Cai, Patrick Reeves, Paul J. Bushway, Marion Lanier, Christopher Walsh, Tomas Kirchhausen, Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte, John Cashman, Mark Mercola. Small Molecule-Mediated TGF-β Type II Receptor Degradation Promotes Cardiomyogenesis in Embryonic Stem Cells. Cell Stem Cell, 2012; 11 (2): 242 DOI: 10.1016/j.stem.2012.04.025

Cite This Page:

Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute. "Mending a broken heart -- with a molecule that turns stem cells into heart cells." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 August 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120802122459.htm>.
Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute. (2012, August 2). Mending a broken heart -- with a molecule that turns stem cells into heart cells. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120802122459.htm
Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute. "Mending a broken heart -- with a molecule that turns stem cells into heart cells." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120802122459.htm (accessed November 27, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, November 27, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) — Researchers in the United States are preparing to discover whether a drug commonly used in human organ transplants can extend the lifespan and health quality of pet dogs. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Newsy (Nov. 26, 2014) — Advances in prosthetics are making replacement body parts stronger and more lifelike than they’ve ever been. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) — The US FDA is announcing new calorie rules on Tuesday that will require everywhere from theaters to vending machines to include calorie counts. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) — Need another reason to eat yogurt every day? Researchers now say it could reduce a person's risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins