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Male infertility: 'Kick-starting' male fertility with missing protein

Date:
September 21, 2012
Source:
Cardiff University
Summary:
Adding a missing protein to infertile human sperm can "kick-start" its ability to fertilize an egg and dramatically increase the chances of a successful pregnancy, scientists have uncovered.

Adding a missing protein to infertile human sperm can 'kick-start' its ability to fertilise an egg and dramatically increase the chances of a successful pregnancy, a team of University scientists have uncovered.

The team from the School of Medicine first found that sperm transfers a vital protein, known as PLC-zeta (PLCz), to the egg upon fertilisation. This sperm protein initiates a process called 'egg activation' which sets off all the biological processes necessary for development of an embryo.

Now, the team has found that eggs that don't fertilise because of a defective PLCz, as in some forms of male infertility, can be treated with the active protein to produce egg activation. The added PLCz kick-starts the fertilisation process and significantly improves the chance of a successful pregnancy.

"We know that some men are infertile because their sperm fail to activate eggs. Even though their sperm fuses with the egg, nothing happens. These sperm may lack a proper functioning version of PLCz, which is essential to trigger the next stage in becoming pregnant," said Professor Tony Lai, who together with Professor Karl Swann led the research team at the University's Institute of Molecular and Experimental Medicine.

"What's important from our research is that we have used human sperm PLCz to obtain the positive results that we had previously observed only in experiments with mice.

"In the lab we have been able to prepare human PLCz protein that is active. If this protein is inactive or missing from sperm, it fails to trigger the process necessary for egg activation -- the next crucial stage of embryo development.

"However, when an unfertilised egg is injected with human PLCz, it responds exactly as it should do at fertilisation, resulting in successful embryo development to the blastocyst stage, vital to pregnancy success," he added.

Published online by the journal Fertility and Sterility September 21, 2012 and funded by the Wellcome Trust, the work strengthens the potential use of PLCz in treating male infertility.

Professor Tony Lai adds: "We've established that this one sperm protein, PLCz, is absolutely critical at the point where life begins.

"Whilst this was a lab experiment and our method could not be used in a fertility clinic in exactly the same way -- there is potential to translate this advance into humans.

"In the future, we could produce the human PLCz protein and use it to stimulate egg activation in a completely natural way. For those couples going through IVF treatment, it could ultimately improve their chances of having a baby and treat male infertility."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Cardiff University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Karl Swann, Shane Windsor, Karen Campbell, Khalil Elgmati, Michail Nomikos, Magdalena Zernicka-Goetz, Nazar Amso, F. Anthony Lai, Adrian Thomas, Christopher Graham. Phospholipase C-ζ-induced Ca2 oscillations cause coincident cytoplasmic movements in human oocytes that failed to fertilize after intracytoplasmic sperm injection. Fertility and Sterility, 2012; 97 (3): 742 DOI: 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2011.12.013

Cite This Page:

Cardiff University. "Male infertility: 'Kick-starting' male fertility with missing protein." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 September 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120921124523.htm>.
Cardiff University. (2012, September 21). Male infertility: 'Kick-starting' male fertility with missing protein. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120921124523.htm
Cardiff University. "Male infertility: 'Kick-starting' male fertility with missing protein." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120921124523.htm (accessed July 25, 2014).

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