Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Proteins in DNA damage response network targeted for new therapies, researchers say

Date:
October 16, 2012
Source:
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute
Summary:
An intricate system to repair DNA damage called the "DNA damage response" (DDR) contains previously unknown components, including proteins that could be targeted as sensitizers for chemotherapy. Some of these targets may already have drugs available that have unrecognized uses in cancer therapy, said the researchers.

Researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center and colleagues at the University of South Florida; Duke University; Johns Hopkins University; the Brazilian National Cancer Institute; and the Rio de Janeiro Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology have discovered that an intricate system to repair DNA damage called the "DNA damage response" (DDR) contains previously unknown components, including proteins that could be targeted as sensitizers for chemotherapy. Some of these targets may already have drugs available that have unrecognized uses in cancer therapy, said the researchers.

Related Articles


The study appears in the Sept. 18 issue of Science Signaling.

"A domain called BRCT is frequently present in proteins involved in the DDR network," said study lead author Alvaro N.A. Monteiro, Ph.D., senior member of Moffitt's Cancer Epidemiology Program. "We undertook a systematic analysis of the BRCT domain, a protein module that plays a critical role in the DDR, and found a large network of interacting proteins centered on BRCT-containing proteins. In doing so, we discovered new potential players in the DDR. These new players may constitute potential biomarkers for drug response or targets for treatment."

According to the authors, their data could be used to build a more comprehensive map of the components and interactions involved in the DDR, a system through which proteins detect DNA damage, promote repair and coordinate the cell cycle.

Because defects in the DDR can lead to cancer, the properly functioning network is considered to be a barrier against tumor growth. Chemotherapy regimens exploit weaknesses in the system to kill cancer cells. The new discoveries augment knowledge about the DDR by adding information on the function of specific proteins involved with BRCT-containing proteins.

"Our expectation is that the establishment of the BRCT-network will help identify potential sensitizers of therapy and accelerate the development of new therapeutic strategies," Monteiro said.

The research was supported in part by the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, National Functional Genomics Center (W81XWH-08-2-0101), the Florida Breast Cancer Foundation, and the National Cancer Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health (P50-CA119997).


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. N. T. Woods, R. D. Mesquita, M. Sweet, M. A. Carvalho, X. Li, Y. Liu, H. Nguyen, C. E. Thomas, E. S. Iversen, S. Marsillac, R. Karchin, J. Koomen, A. N. A. Monteiro. Charting the Landscape of Tandem BRCT Domain-Mediated Protein Interactions. Science Signaling, 2012; 5 (242): rs6 DOI: 10.1126/scisignal.2002255

Cite This Page:

H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute. "Proteins in DNA damage response network targeted for new therapies, researchers say." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 October 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121016085134.htm>.
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute. (2012, October 16). Proteins in DNA damage response network targeted for new therapies, researchers say. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121016085134.htm
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute. "Proteins in DNA damage response network targeted for new therapies, researchers say." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121016085134.htm (accessed November 24, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, November 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Late Cocoa Leaves Bitter Taste

Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Late Cocoa Leaves Bitter Taste

AFP (Nov. 23, 2014) The arable district of Kenema in Sierra Leone -- at the centre of the Ebola outbreak in May -- has been under quarantine for three months as the cocoa harvest comes in. Duration: 01:32 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Don't Fall For Flu Shot Myths

Don't Fall For Flu Shot Myths

Newsy (Nov. 23, 2014) Misconceptions abound when it comes to your annual flu shot. Medical experts say most people older than 6 months should get the shot. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
WFP: Ebola Risks Heightened Among Women Throughout Africa

WFP: Ebola Risks Heightened Among Women Throughout Africa

AFP (Nov. 21, 2014) Having children has always been a frightening prospect in Sierra Leone, the world's most dangerous place to give birth, but Ebola has presented an alarming new threat for expectant mothers. Duration: 00:37 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Newsy (Nov. 21, 2014) Researchers in Beijing discovered a gene called 5-HTA1, and carriers are reportedly 20 percent more likely to be single. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins