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Bond's new crime-fighting device launched: 'Bullet fingerprint' visualization technique

Date:
November 14, 2012
Source:
University of Leicester
Summary:
A 'bullet fingerprint' visualization technique pioneered by a British scientist has been commercialized in the United States.

Dr John Bond of the University of Leicester.
Credit: Image courtesy of University of Leicester

A 'bullet fingerprint' visualisation technique pioneered by a University of Leicester scientist has been commercialised in the US.

Dr John Bond, a senior lecturer in Forensic Sciences in the Department of Chemistry who was awarded an OBE last year for his services to forensic science, is one of the driving forces -- along with Dr Lisa Smith, a lecturer in the Department of Criminology -- behind the University of Leicester's new Forensic Science Institute that opens on 19 November. Dr Bond's work on Visualizing Fingerprint Corrosion of Metal was voted one of the top 50 inventions of 2008 by Time Magazine and one of the inventions most likely to change the world in 2009 by BBC Focus Magazine

Dr Bond developed the innovative technique, in collaboration with the University, of visualising fingerprints on metal while working at Northamptonshire Police. The former Scientific Support Manager at Northamptonshire Police found a technique that reveals previously undiscovered fingerprints on metal, especially gun shell casings, by applying a large voltage to the metal and then adding ceramic beads coated with a fine powder to the surface.

This reacts with the corrosion on the metal left over from fingerprints, even after they have been wiped off, revealing the original fingerprint pattern.

The innovation was patented by the Police Authority and an exclusive licence was granted to Consoliteฎ Forensics Ltd to manufacture, market and sell the Cartridge Electrostatic Recovery and Analysis (CERA™) worldwide.

The first machine has recently been sold, yielding the Police Authority a royalty of several thousand pounds.

Dr Bond, who still retains close links with the Force although now employed by the University of Leicester, revealed that other subsequent inventions are in the process of being commercialised by Consolite and the University.

He said: "I am delighted to hear that the first machine has been sold and that this is bringing some benefit to policing in Northamptonshire.

"I still retain strong links with the Force in respect of overseeing University student projects around the area of scientific support.

"In April, I gave evidence in court about CERA in Marin County, California which was a milestone and next month I am visiting California again to discuss CERA with the alcohol, tobacco and firearms agency that has a CERA machine on test.

"It reflects the fact that CERA is now established as a new way of finding fingerprints, the innovation is not a flash in the pan.

"It has proved a gateway to further development to taking fingerprints from surfaces exposed to extreme heat (shell casing), waterlogging (say a weapon which has been down a drain) and everyday items such as thermal paper, till receipts and cashpoint ATM surrounds.

"And CERA has enabled investigators to look at historic events like the Lockerbie bombing from a different perspective, opening up new opportunities from items that may have been handled by the bomber."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Leicester. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Leicester. "Bond's new crime-fighting device launched: 'Bullet fingerprint' visualization technique." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 November 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121114083924.htm>.
University of Leicester. (2012, November 14). Bond's new crime-fighting device launched: 'Bullet fingerprint' visualization technique. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121114083924.htm
University of Leicester. "Bond's new crime-fighting device launched: 'Bullet fingerprint' visualization technique." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121114083924.htm (accessed July 25, 2014).

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