Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Materials for next generation transparent conductors

Date:
November 19, 2012
Source:
The Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR)
Summary:
Researchers are working on new sustainable nanomaterials, processes and devices for transparent conductors used to make cheaper and more efficient electronics and organic solar cells.

A*STAR's Institute of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE) and Cima NanoTech, a US multinational company, have signed an agreement to jointly work on new sustainable nanomaterials, processes and devices for transparent conductors used to make cheaper and more efficient electronics and organic solar cells.

Related Articles


IMRE and Cima NanoTech are collaborating to develop new transparent conductive materials and components, based on Cima's SANTE™ Technology[1] and IMRE's know-how in printed electronics[2]. These innovations will enable efficient conductive interfaces with high transparency, which can be developed into low cost and high performance products for displays, organic solar cells, and flexible electronics.

Conventional Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) and Transparent Conductive Oxides (TCO) used in today's solar cells, OLEDs, flat panel TVs, and touchscreen displays have limitations in conductivity, flexibility, and cost. These new materials and processes that IMRE and Cima are developing will potentially enable faster response touch screens for large flexible displays and reduce production cost.

"Cima is particularly interested in IMRE's extensive electronics materials systems and device fabrication capabilities," said Mr Jon Brodd, Cima NanoTech's Chief Executive Officer (Singapore). IMRE and CIMA are working together to develop enabling nanotechnology materials, components, and processing methods to support new market applications in transparent conductors and printed electronics with SANTE(™), Cima NanoTech's self aligning nanoparticle network.

"We are collaborating with Cima to develop new transparent conductor applications that will lead to cheaper, flexible, more eco-friendly and sustainable products," said Dr Zhang Jie, the key scientist leading IMRE's printed electronics initiative. The research team will develop applications using novel, sustainable transparent conductor materials as an alternative to conventional ITO-based materials.

"Innovations in materials R&D are crucial in evolving today's devices into new products with tomorrow's technology. IMRE's research portfolio covers the entire printed electronics value chain that includes materials, processes, optimisation and reliability testing for integrated printed electronics prototypes. I am glad that we can present a diverse suite of capabilities in partnering Cima in the area of transparent conductors and printed electronics," said Prof Andy Hor, IMRE's Executive Director.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by The Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

The Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR). "Materials for next generation transparent conductors." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 November 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121119093453.htm>.
The Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR). (2012, November 19). Materials for next generation transparent conductors. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121119093453.htm
The Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR). "Materials for next generation transparent conductors." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121119093453.htm (accessed October 30, 2014).

Share This



More Matter & Energy News

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Mind-Controlled Prosthetic Arm Restores Amputee Dexterity

Mind-Controlled Prosthetic Arm Restores Amputee Dexterity

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 29, 2014) A Swedish amputee who became the first person to ever receive a brain controlled prosthetic arm is able to manipulate and handle delicate objects with an unprecedented level of dexterity. The device is connected directly to his bone, nerves and muscles, giving him the ability to control it with his thoughts. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robots Get Funky on the Dance Floor

Robots Get Funky on the Dance Floor

AP (Oct. 29, 2014) Dancing, spinning and fighting robots are showing off their agility at "Robocomp" in Krakow. (Oct. 29) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Saharan Solar Project to Power Europe

Saharan Solar Project to Power Europe

Reuters - Business Video Online (Oct. 29, 2014) A solar energy project in the Tunisian Sahara aims to generate enough clean energy by 2018 to power two million European homes. Matt Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Lowe's Testing Robot Sales Assistants in California Store

Lowe's Testing Robot Sales Assistants in California Store

Buzz60 (Oct. 29, 2014) Lowe’s is testing out what it’s describing as a robotic shopping assistant in one of its Orchard Supply Hardware Stores in California. Jen Markham explains. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

    Technology News



    Save/Print:
    Share:

    Free Subscriptions


    Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

    Get Social & Mobile


    Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

    Have Feedback?


    Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
    Mobile: iPhone Android Web
    Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
    Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
    Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins