Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

'Very low' complication rates with regional anesthesia in children

Date:
December 5, 2012
Source:
International Anesthesia Research Society (IARS)
Summary:
A review of more than 15,000 nerve block procedures performed in children at U.S. hospitals finds little or no risk of permanent complications or death, reports a new study

A review of more than 15,000 nerve block procedures performed in children at U.S. hospitals finds little or no risk of permanent complications or death, reports a study in the December issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia, official journal of the International Anesthesia Research Society (IARS).

"Regional anesthesia in children as commonly performed in the United States has a very low rate of complications," write Dr David M. Polaner of Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora. At a time of increasing use of regional anesthesia, the study provides reassurance that nerve block procedures are safe for anesthesia or pain control in children.

No Serious Complications of Regional Nerve Blocks

The researchers used a nationwide anesthesiology database, the Pediatric Regional Anesthesia Network, to collect detailed information on regional anesthesia procedures in children, including any complications during and after surgery. The data were "rigorously audited" to identify and correct errors and to ensure that all regional anesthetics performed at the participating hospitals were included.

Regional anesthesia provides a useful approach to anesthesia during surgery or pain control after surgery. As opposed to general anesthesia where the patient inhales an anesthetic gas, regional anesthesia consists of injections of anesthetic drugs around specific nerves to "block" sensation in that part of the body.

The review identified nearly 15,000 regional anesthesia procedures performed between 2007 and 2010. About 11,000 procedures consisted of a single anesthetic injection. The rest were "continuous block" procedures, with insertion of a catheter near the nerve for repeated anesthetic injections.

Although risk varied by the type and location of nerve block, overall complication rates were low. Most importantly, there were no deaths or serious complications leading to permanent injury. For single-injection procedures, the most common complication was inability to place the block or block failure -- two percent of the total.

Continuous block procedures had a higher complication rate -- most commonly problems in catheter placement (such as kinking or dislodgement). In this group, the block failure rate was nine percent.

Increased Use Driven by Ultrasound Guidance

The single most common block (40 percent) was a single-injection block in the pelvic area (caudal block) for procedures in the lower body (for example, hernia surgery). However, blocks of the peripheral nerves were common as well (35 percent), especially for surgery on the upper and lower limbs.

The large numbers of single-injection peripheral nerve blocks seemed related to increased use of ultrasound to guide local anesthetic injections. Ultrasound was used in more than 80 percent of upper-limb blocks and nearly 70 percent of lower-limb blocks.

As the use of regional anesthesia continues to increase, there is a lack of "detailed and complete" information on its safety in children. The best available studies, performed in Europe, are more than a decade old. Thus they may not reflect modern practice, including the use of ultrasound guidance.

Because complications of regional anesthesia are relatively uncommon, very large databases are needed to provide meaningful estimates of the true risks. The new analysis of an extensive, high-quality database suggests that, as in the previous studies from Europe, the complication risk is very low.

Most importantly, the risk of death or serious complications appears minimal, with no such cases in nearly 15,000 procedures over three years. Dr Polaner and coauthors add, "Multicenter collaborative networks such as the Pediatric Regional Anesthesia Network can facilitate the collection of detailed prospective data for research and quality improvement.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by International Anesthesia Research Society (IARS). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. David M. Polaner, Andreas H. Taenzer, Benjamin J. Walker, Adrian Bosenberg, Elliot J. Krane, Santhanam Suresh, Christine Wolf, Lynn D. Martin. Pediatric Regional Anesthesia Network (PRAN). Anesthesia & Analgesia, 2012; 115 (6): 1353 DOI: 10.1213/ANE.0b013e31825d9f4b

Cite This Page:

International Anesthesia Research Society (IARS). "'Very low' complication rates with regional anesthesia in children." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 December 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121205102617.htm>.
International Anesthesia Research Society (IARS). (2012, December 5). 'Very low' complication rates with regional anesthesia in children. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121205102617.htm
International Anesthesia Research Society (IARS). "'Very low' complication rates with regional anesthesia in children." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121205102617.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Get on Your Bike! London Cycling Popularity Soars Despite Danger

Get on Your Bike! London Cycling Popularity Soars Despite Danger

AFP (Sep. 1, 2014) Wedged between buses, lorries and cars, cycling in London isn't for the faint hearted. Nevertheless the number of people choosing to bike in the British capital has doubled over the past 15 years. Duration: 02:27 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Can You Train Your Brain To Eat Healthy?

Can You Train Your Brain To Eat Healthy?

Newsy (Sep. 1, 2014) New research says if you condition yourself to eat healthy foods, eventually you'll crave them instead of junk food. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) A new study suggests 100 percent of adult humans (those over 18 years of age) have Demodex mites living in their faces. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

AFP (Aug. 30, 2014) Authorities in Liberia try to stem the spread of the Ebola epidemic by raising awareness and setting up sanitation units for people to wash their hands. Duration: 00:41 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins