Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Anti-aging gene identified as tumor suppressor in mice: Mice without pro-longevity gene SIRT6 had higher risk of gastrointestinal cancers

Date:
December 11, 2012
Source:
University of Michigan Health System
Summary:
A new study sheds more light on how an anti-aging gene suppresses cancer growth, new research shows.

A new study sheds more light on how an anti-aging gene suppresses cancer growth, joint University of Michigan Health System and Harvard Medical School research shows.

Related Articles


Loss of the SIRT6 protein in mice increases the number, size and aggressiveness of tumors, according to the new research published in the scientific journal Cell. The study also suggests that the loss of SIRT6 promotes tumor growth in human colon and pancreatic cancers.

"It is critical to understand the spectrum of genes that suppress tumor development," says co-senior author David Lombard, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of pathology and assistant research professor at the U-M Institute of Gerontology at the U-M Medical School.

"Our research suggests SIRT6 may have a critical role in blocking cancer and controlling cellular metabolism. We hope to build on this work to better understand how this protein suppresses tumor development, and provide insight into potential future means of reprogramming cancer metabolism."

The research was done in conjunction with the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center at Harvard Medical School. Raul Mostoslavsky, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, was the co-senior author.

The new research highlights the role SIRT6 plays in dampening cancer growth by repressing aerobic glycolysis -- a major feature of cancer cells that involves the conversion of glucose to lactate. SIRT6 also inhibits activity of the key cancer gene Myc.

Many studies in cancer biology have focused on the importance of tumor suppressor proteins and how they may protect cells from progressing to cancer.

The new research follows up on previous studies that have tied SIRT6 to longevity in male mice. Other research has also shown that the protein may protect against diet-induced obesity.

"This work points to the conservation of biological mechanisms between lower organisms and humans, and the importance of fundamental basic research," says Lombard, a researcher at the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center. "This family of proteins was originally studied in yeast. It turns out to have key roles in promoting mammalian health."

National Institutes of Health (Awards GM093072-01, DK088190-01A1 and GM101171); University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ellison Medical Foundation, Pardee Foundation, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Research Foundation.

Mostoslavsky is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of Sirtris, a company that is attempting to develop sirtuin-directed therapeutics.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Michigan Health System. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Carlos Sebastián, Bernadette M.M. Zwaans, Dafne M. Silberman, Melissa Gymrek, Alon Goren, Lei Zhong, Oren Ram, Jessica Truelove, Alexander R. Guimaraes, Debra Toiber, Claudia Cosentino, Joel K. Greenson, Alasdair I. MacDonald, Liane McGlynn, Fraser Maxwell, Joanne Edwards, Sofia Giacosa, Ernesto Guccione, Ralph Weissleder, Bradley E. Bernstein, Aviv Regev, Paul G. Shiels, David B. Lombard, Raul Mostoslavsky. The Histone Deacetylase SIRT6 Is a Tumor Suppressor that Controls Cancer Metabolism. Cell, 2012; 151 (6): 1185 DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2012.10.047

Cite This Page:

University of Michigan Health System. "Anti-aging gene identified as tumor suppressor in mice: Mice without pro-longevity gene SIRT6 had higher risk of gastrointestinal cancers." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 December 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121211113001.htm>.
University of Michigan Health System. (2012, December 11). Anti-aging gene identified as tumor suppressor in mice: Mice without pro-longevity gene SIRT6 had higher risk of gastrointestinal cancers. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121211113001.htm
University of Michigan Health System. "Anti-aging gene identified as tumor suppressor in mice: Mice without pro-longevity gene SIRT6 had higher risk of gastrointestinal cancers." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121211113001.htm (accessed November 24, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, November 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Winter Can Cause Depression — Here's How To Combat It

Winter Can Cause Depression — Here's How To Combat It

Newsy (Nov. 23, 2014) — Millions of American suffer from seasonal depression every year. It can lead to adverse health effects, but there are ways to ease symptoms. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Late Cocoa Leaves Bitter Taste

Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Late Cocoa Leaves Bitter Taste

AFP (Nov. 23, 2014) — The arable district of Kenema in Sierra Leone -- at the centre of the Ebola outbreak in May -- has been under quarantine for three months as the cocoa harvest comes in. Duration: 01:32 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Don't Fall For Flu Shot Myths

Don't Fall For Flu Shot Myths

Newsy (Nov. 23, 2014) — Misconceptions abound when it comes to your annual flu shot. Medical experts say most people older than 6 months should get the shot. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Indians Muck in for Cleaner Communities

Indians Muck in for Cleaner Communities

AFP (Nov. 22, 2014) — India's government is urging all citizens to come together in a mass movement to clean the nation -- but will people heed the call? Duration: 02:39 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins