Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Women with pre-eclampsia are at higher risk of complications following childbirth

Date:
January 10, 2013
Source:
Wiley
Summary:
Women with pre-eclampsia are at a higher risk of complications following delivery and should continue to be monitored for up to 72 hours, suggests a new review.

Women with pre-eclampsia are at a higher risk of complications following delivery and should continue to be monitored for up to 72 hours, suggests a new review published January 11 in The Obstetrician and Gynaecologist (TOG).

The review analyses the health risks associated with postnatal hypertension, elevated blood pressure that occurs after childbirth, and looks at the women at risk of this condition and treatments available.

There is extensive literature on hypertension in the antenatal and intrapartum period, but there is little information on postpartum hypertension.

Following an uncomplicated pregnancy most women will experience increased blood pressure during the postpartum period; however, sustained hypertension in the postnatal period can be a life threatening condition, states the review.

Women most at risk of developing postnatal hypertension are those who have had pregnancy induced hypertension or pre-eclampsia. These women remain at risk of serious complications following delivery and should continue to be monitored as an inpatient for at least 72 hours, says the review. However, women can also develop hypertension following delivery without prior risk factors. Symptoms can include headaches, visual disturbance, nausea and vomiting.

The potential complications of pre-eclampsia in the postpartum period are largely similar to those in the antenatal period with the exception of fetal complications and severe hypertension should prompt urgent treatment to prevent cerebral haemorrhage, says the review.

The review looks at a previous study which analysed the outcomes of women readmitted to hospital in the postnatal period (up to day 24) who received a diagnosis of pre-eclampsia. The results showed a high incidence of complications: 16% were diagnosed with eclampsia, 9% with pulmonary oedema (a build up of fluid) and one maternal death was reported.

Recently published NICE guidance for postpartum care indicates that blood pressure should be measured within 6 hours of delivery. Furthermore, at the first postnatal contact, all women should be made aware of the symptoms of pre-eclampsia along with the need to urgently contact an appropriate health professional if they have symptoms.

The authors of the review emphasise the need for prolonged vigilance in the postpartum period and the importance of investigating reported symptoms in at-risk women. They also recommend that both hospital and community teams need to have referral and management guidelines in place around postnatal hypertension.

Furthermore, the authors of the review conclude that women at increased risk of hypertension should be offered low-dose aspirin and increased blood pressure surveillance in a future pregnancy.

Jason Waugh, co-author of the review and TOG's Editor-in-Chief said: "There is little evidence to guide clinicians treating postpartum hypertension. Poorly managed postpartum hypertension frequently causes unnecessary concern for the patient and her carers, delays discharge from hospital and will occasionally place women at risk of significant complications.

"Women with pre-eclampsia should be encouraged to delay discharge and once they leave hospital the community midwife should monitor blood pressure for the first 2 weeks. This is then followed up at the 6-week postnatal visit. If symptoms persist there may be an underlying cause."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wiley. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Marie Smith, Jason Waugh, Catherine Nelson-Piercy. Management of postpartum hypertension. The Obstetrician & Gynaecologist, 2013; 15 (1): 45 DOI: 10.1111/j.1744-4667.2012.00144.x

Cite This Page:

Wiley. "Women with pre-eclampsia are at higher risk of complications following childbirth." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 January 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130110212327.htm>.
Wiley. (2013, January 10). Women with pre-eclampsia are at higher risk of complications following childbirth. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130110212327.htm
Wiley. "Women with pre-eclampsia are at higher risk of complications following childbirth." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130110212327.htm (accessed October 1, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Newsy (Oct. 1, 2014) A new study says children born less than one year and more than five years after a sibling can have an increased risk for autism. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robotic Hair Restoration

Robotic Hair Restoration

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) A new robotic procedure is changing the way we transplant hair. The ARTAS robot leaves no linear scarring and provides more natural results. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Insertable Cardiac Monitor

Insertable Cardiac Monitor

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) A heart monitor the size of a paperclip that can save your life. The “Reveal Linq” allows a doctor to monitor patients with A-Fib on a continuous basis for up to 3 years! Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Attacking Superbugs

Attacking Superbugs

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) Two weapons hospitals can use to attack superbugs. Scientists in Ireland created a new gel resistant to superbugs, and a robot that can disinfect a room in minutes. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins