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Eastern Europe: Tree rings reveal climate variability and human history

Date:
January 14, 2013
Source:
Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL
Summary:
A total of 545 precisely dated tree-ring width samples, both from living trees and from larch wood taken from historical buildings in the northern Carpathian arc of Slovakia, were used to reconstruct May-June temperatures yearly back to 1040 AD. The tree-ring data from the Tatra Mountains best reflects the climate history of Eastern Europe, with a geographical focus on the Baltic.

Annually resolved variations of May-June temperature between 1040 and 2011 AD, based on 545 samples of living trees and historical timbers (Larix decidua Mill.) from the Slovakian Tatra Mountains in the northwestern Carpathian arc.
Credit: Copyright Ulf Buentgen, WSL

A total of 545 precisely dated tree-ring width samples, both from living trees and from larch wood (Larix decidua Mill.) taken from historical buildings in the northern Carpathian arc of Slovakia, were used to reconstruct May-June temperatures yearly back to 1040 AD. The tree-ring data from the Tatra Mountains best reflects the climate history of Eastern Europe, with a geographical focus on the Baltic. The tree-ring record reveals several cold phases around ~1150, 1400, and in the 19th century. Mild springtime conditions occurred in the first half of the 12th century, as well as from ~1400-1780. The amount of climate warming since the mid-20th century appears unprecedented in the millennium-long context.

In addition to the development of the tree ring-based temperature history, the interdisciplinary research team* compared past climate variability with human history. Plague outbreaks, political conflicts and migration movements often matched periods of cooler temperatures. Moreover, fluctuations in settlement activity appear to be linked to climate variability. The Black Death in the mid-14th century, the Thirty Years War between ~1618-1648 and the Russian crusade of Napoleon in 1812 are three most prominent examples of climate-culture interactions.

The new evidence from Eastern Europe partially confirms similar observations from previous dendroclimatological investigations in Central Europe. However, the lead author of both studies, Ulf Büntgen, is cautious about making simplified conclusions: “the relationship between climate and culture is extremely complex and certainly not yet well enough understood. Nevertheless, we now better recognize that well documented and carefully analyzed tree-ring chronologies can contain much more information than supposed so far”. Thus, more data, independent studies and interdisciplinary approaches are of great interest for the enhancement of future knowledge.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Büntgen, U.; Kyncl, T.; Ginzler, C.; Jacks, D.S.; Esper, J.; Tegel, W.; Heussner, K.U.; Kyncl, J. Filling the Eastern European gap in millennium-long temperature reconstructions. PNAS, 2013 DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1211485110

Cite This Page:

Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL. "Eastern Europe: Tree rings reveal climate variability and human history." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 January 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130114152950.htm>.
Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL. (2013, January 14). Eastern Europe: Tree rings reveal climate variability and human history. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130114152950.htm
Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL. "Eastern Europe: Tree rings reveal climate variability and human history." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130114152950.htm (accessed October 21, 2014).

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