Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Better syringe designs could nearly eradicate global annual HIV infections from syringe sharing within eight years

Date:
January 16, 2013
Source:
RTI International
Summary:
Switching the type of syringe used by people who inject drugs could help curb HIV transmission in countries with injection-driven epidemics within eight years, according to a new article.

Low dead-space syringes could help reduce HIV transmission in countries with injection-driven epidemics.
Credit: Image courtesy of RTI International

Switching the type of syringe used by people who inject drugs could help curb HIV transmission in countries with injection-driven epidemics within eight years, according to a new article by researchers at RTI International and Futures Institute.

Related Articles


The commentary, published in the January issue of International Journal of Drug Policy (IJDP), summarizes existing evidence regarding how low dead-space syringes can help reduce HIV transmission and estimates potential impacts on HIV transmission among people who inject drugs.

According to the authors, when a plunger on a syringe is fully depressed, all syringes retain fluid in what has been termed "dead space." In high dead-space syringes, a 1000 times more blood is retained in the syringe after washing than in low dead-space syringes.

This suggests that if a person who injects drugs shares a high dead-space syringe with an HIV-positive injecting partner, they are more likely to be exposed to HIV than if he or she shared a low dead-space syringe.

Using a simulation model, the authors found that switching to low dead-space syringes could lead to major reductions in HIV transmission in countries with injection-driven epidemics, such as China, Indonesia, Russia, Ukraine and Vietnam. According to the model, the change could reduce annual HIV infections from syringe sharing to nearly zero within eight years.

"Although additional research is needed, this intervention should be implemented and evaluated as soon as possible," said William Zule, Dr.P.H., a senior research health analyst at RTI International and lead author of the paper. "Switching from high dead-space to low dead-space syringes should be viewed as an additional component to comprehensive HIV prevention packages."

Preventing or controlling concentrated HIV epidemics among persons who inject drugs may also prevent the sexual diffusion of HIV from people who inject drugs to other groups. "While the low dead-space syringe still requires testing in targeted populations and there remains considerable work to be done on its implementation, nevertheless we ought to welcome the emergence of a potentially effective new tool in the fight against HIV," said professor Gerry Stimson, director of Knowledge-Action-Change and editor of the IJDP.

The paper also describes potential obstacles to transitioning from high dead-space to low dead-space needles and syringes and presents strategies for overcoming these barriers. Among the reasons low dead-space syringes have not yet been considered a viable prevention intervention include limited awareness of how needle and syringe design influence HIV transmission and a general lack of information about low dead-space syringes.

"There are many difficulties related to scaling up effective HIV prevention programs in countries with HIV epidemics among persons who inject drugs," said Zule. "This is a comparatively simple and low-cost intervention that has the potential to be extremely effective."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by RTI International. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. William A. Zule, Harry E. Cross, John Stover, Carel Pretorius. Low dead space syringes: Authors’ response. International Journal of Drug Policy, 2013; 24 (1): 21 DOI: 10.1016/j.drugpo.2012.11.003

Cite This Page:

RTI International. "Better syringe designs could nearly eradicate global annual HIV infections from syringe sharing within eight years." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 January 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130116085949.htm>.
RTI International. (2013, January 16). Better syringe designs could nearly eradicate global annual HIV infections from syringe sharing within eight years. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130116085949.htm
RTI International. "Better syringe designs could nearly eradicate global annual HIV infections from syringe sharing within eight years." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130116085949.htm (accessed December 19, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, December 19, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

The Best Tips to Curb Holiday Carbs

The Best Tips to Curb Holiday Carbs

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) It's hard to resist those delicious but fattening carbs we all crave during the winter months, but there are some ways to stay satisfied without consuming the extra calories. Vanessa Freeman (@VanessaFreeTV) has the details. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sierra Leone Bikers Spread the Message to Fight Ebola

Sierra Leone Bikers Spread the Message to Fight Ebola

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) More than 100 motorcyclists hit the road to spread awareness messages about Ebola. Nearly 7,000 people have now died from the virus, almost all of them in west Africa, according to the World Health Organization. Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) In Yarumal, a village in N. Colombia, Alzheimer's has ravaged a disproportionately large number of families. A genetic "curse" that may pave the way for research on how to treat the disease that claims a new victim every four seconds. Duration: 02:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Double-Amputee Becomes First To Move Two Prosthetic Arms With His Mind

Double-Amputee Becomes First To Move Two Prosthetic Arms With His Mind

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) A double-amputee makes history by becoming the first person to wear and operate two prosthetic arms using only his mind. Jen Markham has the story. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins