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BPA substitute could spell trouble: Experiments show bisphenol S also disrupts hormone activity

Date:
January 22, 2013
Source:
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston
Summary:
Researchers found that like BPA, BPS disrupts cellular responses to the hormone estrogen, changing patterns of cell growth and death and hormone release. Also like BPA, it does so at extremely low levels of exposure.

How high is your exposure to BPA and BPS? "BPA-free" products are often made from plastic containing a compound called bisphenol S (BPS). In addition to having similar names, BPA and BPS share a similar structure and versatility. Like BPA, the study found, BPS disrupts cellular responses to the hormone estrogen, changing patterns of cell growth and death and hormone release.
Credit: ฉ monticellllo / Fotolia

A few years ago, manufacturers of water bottles, food containers, and baby products had a big problem. A key ingredient of the plastics they used to make their merchandise, an organic compound called bisphenol A, had been linked by scientists to diabetes, asthma and cancer and altered prostate and neurological development. The FDA and state legislatures were considering action to restrict BPA's use, and the public was pressuring retailers to remove BPA-containing items from their shelves.

The industry responded by creating "BPA-free" products, which were made from plastic containing a compound called bisphenol S. In addition to having similar names, BPA and BPS share a similar structure and versatility: BPS is now known to be used in everything from currency to thermal receipt paper, and widespread human exposure to BPS was confirmed in a 2012 analysis of urine samples taken in the U.S., Japan, China and five other Asian countries.

According to a study by University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston researchers, though, BPS also resembles BPA in a more problematic way. Like BPA, the study found, BPS disrupts cellular responses to the hormone estrogen, changing patterns of cell growth and death and hormone release. Also like BPA, it does so at extremely low levels of exposure.

"Our studies show that BPS is active at femtomolar to picomolar concentrations just like endogenous hormones -- that's in the range of parts per trillion to quadrillion," said UTMB professor Cheryl Watson, senior author of a paper on the study now online in the advance publications section of Environmental Health Perspectives. "Those are levels likely to be produced by BPS leaching from containers into their contents."

Watson and graduate student Ren้ Vi๑as conducted cell-culture experiments to examine the effects of BPS on a form of signaling that involves estrogen receptors -- the "receivers" of a biochemical message -- acting in the cell's outer membrane instead of the cell nucleus. Where nuclear signaling involves interaction with DNA to produce proteins and requires hours to days, membrane signaling (also called "non-genomic" signaling) acts through much quicker mechanisms, generating a response in seconds or minutes.

Watson and Vi๑as focused on key biochemical pathways that are normally stimulated when estrogen activates membrane receptors. One, involving a protein known as ERK, is linked to cell growth; another, labeled JNK, is tied to cell death. In addition, they examined the ability of BPS to activate proteins called caspases (also linked to cell death) and promote the release of prolactin, a hormone that stimulates lactation and influences many other functions.

"These pathways form a complicated web of signals, and we're going to need to study them more closely to fully understand how they work," Watson said. "On its own, though, this study shows us that very low levels of BPS can disrupt natural estrogen hormone actions in ways similar to what we see with BPA. That's a real cause for concern."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Ren้ Vi๑as, Cheryl S. Watson. Bisphenol S Disrupts Estradiol-Induced Nongenomic Signaling in a Rat Pituitary Cell Line: Effects on Cell Functions. Environmental Health Perspectives, 2013; DOI: 10.1289/ehp.1205826

Cite This Page:

University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. "BPA substitute could spell trouble: Experiments show bisphenol S also disrupts hormone activity." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 January 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130122191412.htm>.
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. (2013, January 22). BPA substitute could spell trouble: Experiments show bisphenol S also disrupts hormone activity. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130122191412.htm
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. "BPA substitute could spell trouble: Experiments show bisphenol S also disrupts hormone activity." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130122191412.htm (accessed July 24, 2014).

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